Acknowledgements

As will shortly become evident, this book is in part a companion volume to the (2002) revised edition of my Write In Style. I would like to rethank all the individuals and institutions cited in that publication's acknowledgements anyway, because their influence, contribution and friendship attend this volume too. Since, however, this is now a discrete work, I want to pay affectionate and grateful tribute to those who had a direct impact on the chapters that follow.

I am very grateful to my good friends and/or colleagues Roger Allen, Colin Brezicki, John Fleming, Andrew Grimshaw, Robert Kapadia, Brendan Law, Wendy Pollard, Jane Richardson and Mike and Louise Tucker for helpfully critical and enabling suggestions, interest and support, and to Jonathan Smith, whose inspirational The Learning Game taught me a great deal very fast. And I am especially indebted to Louise Berridge, a brilliant ex-student of mine who crucially apprised me of the Anglo-Saxon genitive's relevance to the use of the apostrophe.

I want also to thank Jackie Max and Tim Raynor of NatWest Bank's IT Learning and Development operation. They engaged me to teach grammar and all its related issues to successive cadres of able professionals who felt they had missed out on grammar schooling in their earlier years. No less warm is my gratitude to Eddie and Janet Cook, under whose editorishop of Teeline magazine I wrote a monthly column on English Usage from 1986-94.

I owe another and considerable debt to my daughter Jo, whose observations about the Literacy Hour have proved invaluable in my own efforts in that area. She is a primary-school teacher whose every hour features things I could never imagine coping with, let alone triumphing in, as she does, and that has proved as instructive as humbling.

Authors thank their editors as a matter of course and courtesy, so I want to say that this tribute to Anna Clarkson and Louise Mellor is on

-xviii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Good Grammar Guide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 203

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.