Stardom: Industry of Desire

By Christine Gledhill | Go to book overview

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

There is a whole publishing industry devoted to stars and stardom, so any bibliography must be selective. This list offers extensive coverage of articles and books in English on theoretical and critical issues. It includes critical articles or more popular works on individual stars where these are exemplary of general issues or for what they reveal of how stars are constructed and circulate in society. For the same reason it also includes a selection of more general popular and early books on stars. On the whole, review articles on the careers of, or interviews with, individual stars are excluded. The list also includes some general works on the sociology of leisure and celebrity, cultural politics, fashion, the body, sexuality and representation which are central to a study of stars and stardom.

Useful further sources of bibliographic information are the British Film Institute Information Department index cards under the headings: stars, star system (different countries), stars (individual), acting, actors and actresses, homosexuality and cinema, homosexuality and the media, homo-sexuals and television, racialism in the cinema, racialism in the cinema-negroes, blacks and the cinema (different countries), personalities on television, blacks and television.

Stephen Bourne's dissertation, 'Black and Asian performers in British Films 1930-1949' (London College of Printing, 1988), provides useful biographical, filmographic and bibliographic information. The Women's Film Bibliography, newly revised by Sam Cook and published by the British Film Institute Education Department, contains a comprehensive section on women stars. The BFI Education Department also publishes a number of teaching packs on stars which are listed in the following bibliography. The BFI TV Unit is currently working on a project which will record all the appearances of black actors in British television.

Affron, C. (1977) Star Acting, New York: E.P. Dutton. On Gish, Garbo and Davis.
--(1980) 'Performing performing: irony and affect', Cinema Journal, 20, 1, Fall. On Lana Turner in Ziegfeld Girl (1941) and Imitation of Life (1959).

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Stardom: Industry of Desire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Introduction xiii
  • Part I - The System 1
  • 1 - Seeing Stars 3
  • 2 - The Emergence of the Star System in America 17
  • 3 - The Carole Lombard in Macy's Window 30
  • 4 - The Building of Popular Images 40
  • 5 - Fatal Beauties 45
  • Part II - Stars and Society 55
  • 6 - Charisma 57
  • 7 - Shirley Temple and the House of Rockefeller 60
  • 8 - 'Puffed Sleeves Before Tea-Time' 74
  • 9 - The Return of Jimmy Stewart 92
  • 10 - Three Indian Film Stars 107
  • 11 - A Star is Born and the Construction of Authenticity 132
  • 12 - Feminine Fascinations 141
  • Part III - Performers and Signs 165
  • 13 - Articulating Stardom 167
  • 14 - Screen Acting and the Commutation Test 183
  • 15 - Stars and Genre 198
  • 16 - Signs of Melodrama 207
  • Part IV - Desire, Meaning and Politics 231
  • 17 - In Defence of Violence 233
  • 18 - The Politics of 'Jane Fonda' 237
  • 19 - The Glut of the Personality 251
  • 20 - Pleasure, Ambivalence, Identification 259
  • 21 - 'A Queer Feeling When I Look at You' 283
  • 22 - Monster Metaphors 300
  • Select Bibliography 317
  • Index 332
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