European Union Negotiations: Processes, Networks and Institutions

By Ole Elgström; Christer Jönsson | Go to book overview

Illustrations

Tables
6.1 Infringement cases per member state by stage, 1978-2000 92
6.2 Infringement cases closed in 1999 by stage in the procedures 93
7.1 Autonomy of members of expert groups, Council working groups, and comitology committees, measured in several ways 101
7.2 Furthering national interests in expert groups, Council working groups and comitology committees 102
7.3 What characterizes negotiation behaviour in conflict situations? 103
7.4 What happens in the group when conflict between different interests occurs? 104
7.5 When conflict of interest occurs in your group, what is the outcome? 104
7.6 The spirit of 'saklighet' 105
7.7 Sweden's coalition patterns in different types of committees 107
7.8 How common is it that the Commission acts in the following roles at the meetings in your group? 109
7.9 How common is it that the Presidency acts in the following roles at the meetings in your group? 110
7.10 Importance of contacts 111
7.11 Sources of information 111
11.1 Bilateral, multilateral and bi-multilateral negotiations in EU-US relations: components and issues 175

Figures
8.1 Four different types of negotiation situations 122
10.1 Stylized model of propositions on the role of international cooperative arrangements for EU actorness 156
10.2 The WTO and the OECD 158
10.3 The IMF and the FSF 161

-ix-

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