Human Rights and World Trade: Hunger in International Society

By Ana Gonzalez-Pelaez | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

My first thank you goes to Barry Buzan, who introduced me to the most challenging intellectual experience that I have ever embarked on. From supervising my PhD thesis to co-editing this book, Barry's knowledge and enthusiasm have guided my journey. I am thankful for his commitment to my project and for the amount of work that he has invested in it over the years.

Richard Little has also played a crucial role in the process of putting this book together. He believed in its potential when it was far from its final shape and contributed a great deal to it. His generosity, with his time and his assistance, has been inexhaustible.

Talking about believing in the initial potential of this book, I must thank the publishers of this series, and in particular Heidi Bagtazo and Grace McInnes, who have given a structure to this process and contributed to it in different ways.

I would like to thank the members of the CSD department at the University of Westminster where I did my PhD and Masters in International Relations. It was an inspiring time that opened a new path for me. A particular acknowledgement here for the then director of the department Richard Whitman who examined my PhD thesis and gave useful insights on how to develop my research further.

Another intellectually inspiring source was the English school meetings. I am grateful to the different scholars with whom I have had motivating conversations and great laughs too. A particular thank you to Tonny Brems Knudsen for reading my initial outlines, to Tim Dunne for encouraging my project on Vincent and to Nicholas Wheeler for his email clarifications about the 'Silent Genocide' term.

In the practical chapters, I owe thanks to Anna Carla Lopez from FAO whose help was essential in accessing part of FAO's data. My acknowledgement also to Imelda Dunlop from the World Economic Forum and to Steve Suppam from the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, who provided important sources of information. A thank you here to Julian Oran from the New Economics Forum; his long emails about

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