Communication and Citizenship: Journalism and the Public Sphere in the New Media Age

By Peter Dahlgren; Colin Sparks | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Chapter 4

Beyond balanced pluralism: broadcasting in Germany *

Vincent Porter and Suzanne Hasselbach

By the end of the 1970s, the established duopoly of public broadcasters in the Federal Republic of Germany 1 was under attack by the political parties of the right. The trouble flared up in the CDU-governed Länder of Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein, where their respective Ministerpräsidenten, Ernst Albrecht and Gerhard Stoltenberg, found themselves unable to control the current affairs output of the Hamburg-based ARD station, NDR, which was set up by an inter-Land treaty signed between Hamburg and their two Länder. In 1977, under a CDU majority, the NDR administrative council used its extremely wide-ranging powers to rule that NDR's report on the proposed nuclear power station at Brokdorf was contrary to its constitution. So too was its transmission on its third programme, together with RB, SFB and WDR, of the thirteen-part series Der Betriebsrat (the Works Council), which the West German Employers Association considered too leftist. Incensed by this decision, the NDR director-general, Martin Neuffer, appealed to the Hamburg Administrative Court that the broadcasting council's ruling was ultra vires. He won his case. Stoltenberg's and Albrecht's next move was to announce their Länder's withdrawal from the NDR Treaty, to come into effect in 1980. Both Ministerpräsidenten not only objected to the supposedly leftist reporting, but also wanted more regionalization and, importantly, saw a chance to set up private, fully commercial stations. But the courts prevented the break-up of NDR. This time it was the Federal Administrative Court in West Berlin which put a stop to the politicians' interference. 2

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communication and Citizenship: Journalism and the Public Sphere in the New Media Age
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?