Arts Administration

By John Pick; Malcolm Anderton | Go to book overview

In addition to the licensing of the building and being licensed to present stage or cinema shows in it, the arts administrator must also hold the necessary licences to run restaurants and bars within the venue (we elaborate on this in the following chapter). Also, a fact which often surprises newcomers to arts administration, the arts administrator is responsible for seeing that the necessary royalty on all plays and operas performed under his or her administration is promptly paid (and a licence to perform obtained) and that permission is given (and payment made, when necessary) for the reproduction of pictures, photographs, poems, book extracts or diagrams that are displayed in the programme or in advertising matter. Royalties on all music, whether recorded or 'live', in all kinds of venue must be paid to the Performing Rights Society who will require a weekly account of the music played. Further, royalties must also be paid to the Authors' Licensing and Collecting Society for any copyright work duplicated for use within the organization.

In all, the arts administrator will note that the same government authorities which 'support' the arts, also impel them to conform to a complex framework of government legislation. Once, Dionysus stood on common land and played his lute to attract the crowds to his riotous entertainments. Now he would have to spend many hours making applications to various officials to license his pitch and his show, and then making returns to the authorities who would quickly demand taxes, fees and royalties from him.


REFERENCES

a
Arnold-Baker, C. (1983) Practical Law for Arts Administrators.

b
Baumol, W.J. and Baumol, H. (1985) 'The future of the theatre and the cost disease of the arts', in Bach and the Box (1985).
Baumol, W.J. and Bowen, W.G. (1966) Performing Arts: the Economic Dilemma.

c
CIPFA Leisure and Recreation Statistics, 1992/3.

d
Department of National Heritage Annual Report 1994.

h
Harrod, R. (1951) The Life of John Maynard Keynes.
Hewison, R. (1977) Under Siege.

p
Peacock, A. (1993) Paying the Piper: Culture, Music and Money.
Peacock, A., Shoesmith, E. and Milner G. (1983) Cost Inflation in the Performed Arts.

t
Titmuss, R. (1970) Commitment to Welfare.
Titmuss, R. (1974) Social Policy.

w
Wilson Knight, G. (1962) The Golden Labyrinth.

-77-

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Arts Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Arts 16
  • 2 - Arts Organizations 27
  • 3 - Development of Arts Administration Systems 39
  • References 51
  • 4 - The Context 52
  • References 63
  • 5 - Government Intervention: Supports and Constraints 64
  • References 77
  • 6 - Arts Programming 78
  • 7 - Arts Marketing 92
  • References 106
  • 8 - Development of Arts Audiences 107
  • 9 - Arts Administration: Conclusions 116
  • 10 - Case Studies 131
  • Appendix A 155
  • Appendix B 168
  • Appendix C 170
  • Index 173
  • Leisure and Recreation Management 180
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