Arts Administration

By John Pick; Malcolm Anderton | Go to book overview

8

Development of arts audiences

8.1

ARTS AUDIENCES

Inevitably, we have concentrated in recent chapters upon the arts audience that is most visible, the audience that gathers in a public venue. Yet, elsewhere, there is a larger arts audience, beyond the immediate control of the arts administrator. That is the audience which listens to music on radio, tapes and compact disc, which enjoys drama at home in the form of the classic TV serial or the rented video, and which looks at prints and photographs, not in a gallery, but on the walls of the living room. For the same reason, readers of the 60 000 and more new books that are published in Britain each year also tend to be ignored when 'arts audiences' are counted, because people generally read books at home, and not in a public place where they can form part of an economic statistic. Yet, however difficult it may be accurately to quantify domestic arts activity, it is certainly the case in Britain that many more people enjoy the arts in their own homes than in public venues, and that this is at least as important a part of 'the arts' as the public activities regularly tabulated in official statistics.

Although the arts administrator may control events far less completely, it is still a duty, insofar as is possible, to create conditions for an aesthetic contract, bringing the art into contact, domestically and privately, with a 'proper' audience. The good arts administrator will not, for instance, use a falsely alluring book-jacket. (The authors recall seeing a youth excitedly opening a paperback book on a train. It featured on the cover a waif gazing besottedly into the cleavage of a tightly corseted woman above the phrase 'The boy who wanted more…'. After a couple of pages the puzzled youth put down the book. It was Oliver Twist.) Nor will the good arts administrator promote compact discs, tapes or videos which have deliberately misleading covers or falsely titillating promotional material, because the artists are ill-served by such devices and the work will remain unheard or, in the case of Oliver Twist described above, unread. It is

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Arts Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Arts 16
  • 2 - Arts Organizations 27
  • 3 - Development of Arts Administration Systems 39
  • References 51
  • 4 - The Context 52
  • References 63
  • 5 - Government Intervention: Supports and Constraints 64
  • References 77
  • 6 - Arts Programming 78
  • 7 - Arts Marketing 92
  • References 106
  • 8 - Development of Arts Audiences 107
  • 9 - Arts Administration: Conclusions 116
  • 10 - Case Studies 131
  • Appendix A 155
  • Appendix B 168
  • Appendix C 170
  • Index 173
  • Leisure and Recreation Management 180
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