Arts Administration

By John Pick; Malcolm Anderton | Go to book overview

10

Case studies

The case studies in this section are fictional (though based on common problems faced by real arts administrators) and may be used in a variety of ways. They may be used by the individual reader to sharpen his or her wits, or, perhaps more profitably, they may be used by groups working together, who use the scenarios here as a basis for discussion.

Three things they are not. They are not detailed documentary accounts. In every case the reader will have to make a number of assumptions about further details, and will have to flesh out the given data. (In group discussions, discussions over what would be 'reasonable assumptions' to make about circumstantial detail can be, in the authors' experience, valuable.) Nor are the cases straightforwardly linked to the chapters of the book. It would be a betrayal of all we said in the book's introduction were we now to say that reading the foregoing text has given the reader everything he or she requires to unravel these and other problems. The cases cut across the topics discussed earlier in the book, and draw on the reader's experience outside it. Finally, the case studies do not have one 'correct' answer. Although we have offered a few notes to help work on the cases, we should expect lively minds to disagree with much that we say, and to offer their own answers.

Some other specialist texts would certainly be helpful with particular case studies. In this context we should like to commend Diggle, K. (1994) Arts Marketing, Tomlinson, R. (1994) Boxing Clever: How to Get the Most out of the Box Office, and Raymond, C. (1993) Clear Sightlines.

-131-

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Arts Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Arts 16
  • 2 - Arts Organizations 27
  • 3 - Development of Arts Administration Systems 39
  • References 51
  • 4 - The Context 52
  • References 63
  • 5 - Government Intervention: Supports and Constraints 64
  • References 77
  • 6 - Arts Programming 78
  • 7 - Arts Marketing 92
  • References 106
  • 8 - Development of Arts Audiences 107
  • 9 - Arts Administration: Conclusions 116
  • 10 - Case Studies 131
  • Appendix A 155
  • Appendix B 168
  • Appendix C 170
  • Index 173
  • Leisure and Recreation Management 180
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