Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan

By J. A. A. Stockwin | Go to book overview

First published in Problems of Communism, vol. XVI, Jan-Feb 1967 (US Information Agency)


9

The Communist Party of Japan

WRITING AS RECENTLY as five years ago, an American scholar of Japan's political institutions dismissed the Japanese Communist Party (JCP) as no more effective than its counterpart in the United States' 1 -that is to say, as an insignificant force in Japanese politics. Today, such a belittling assessment no longer appears possible.

Recent statistics measuring the party's progress are quite impressive, indicating that on several counts it has already overtaken the Japanese Socialist Party (JSP), the major leftist political organization. Although the JSP still remains well ahead in terms of votes, 2 its personal membership has long remained stagnant at around 50,000, while that of the JCP has jumped from about 40,000 in 1960 to a little more than 150,000 in 1965. Between 1962 and 1965, circulation of the Communist daily newspaper Akahata (Red Flag) rose from 120,000 to between 200,000 and 250,000, and of its Sunday edition from 260,000 to over 700,000. The party's officially-declared revenues in 1964 were ¥990 million as against only ¥150 million for the JSP and ¥1,569 million for the governing Liberal-Democratic Party (LDP). 3 This was especially remarkable since it indicated that JCP revenues, in money terms, had multiplied 90 times between 1952 and 1964-a period of only mild inflation. In the past few years, membership of organizations under the JCP's control (notably its Youth League, Minseidō) has also risen rapidly. 4

More importantly, the improvement in the party's fortunes is beginning to be reflected in election balloting, especially in the main cities. In the July 1965 elections to the House of Councillors (the upper house of the bicameral National Diet), the votes cast for Communist candidates in the Tokyo constituency exceeded those cast, respectively, for the Socialists, the Kōmeitō,5 and the Democratic Socialist Party (DSP). 6 A similar pattern was evident in the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly election held the same month, in which charges of corruption greatly reduced the share of the vote received by the conservative LDP. The JCP on this occasion polled 10.1 percent of the vote, as compared with only 4.3 percent in the previous Assembly election of 1963.

-122-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 551

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.