Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan

By J. A. A. Stockwin | Go to book overview

First published in Dissent (Melbourne), Spring 1968


10

Japan

IN APRIL of this year the Americans opened a hospital for service casualties from Vietnam at one of their military establishments, which happened to be situated in Oji, a densely populated inner suburb of Tokyo. The purpose of the hospital perturbed many local residents, some of whom feared a whole range of possible consequences, including the introduction of cholera, the noise of helicopters bringing in patients, the prospect of school children at several schools in the vicinity being affected by the sight of maimed war victims, and the danger that an influx of footloose GIs would encourage the re-emergence of local prostitution.

A number of protests were made, at local and national level, shortly after the plan became known, but the issue did not attract much attention until organised groups of students converged on the building with the intention of forcing an entry, coming into direct and violent conflict with the police as a result.

The violence used by the students, who wielded baulks of timber and pieces of steel against the police, seems to have distressed local residents almost as much as the prospect of having to put up with the hospital (which, as one local put it, 'brings the blood of Vietnam into our midst'), especially as the demonstrations had caused not inconsiderable damage, and some students had burst into private houses with their shoes on.

The local reaction, therefore, was to redouble efforts to organise independent local opposition to the hospital (the support of Tokyo's radical Governor, Minobe, was assured), and to try to make sure that the students did not get another chance to create havoc. Paradoxically, the student violence had served to increase local awareness and participation, but at the expense of their own alienation from it.

The students involved were members of the Sampa Zengakuren ('Sampa' means 'Three faction'; 'Zengakuren' is an abbreviation for 'National Federation of Students' Self-Government Associations'). This is the most anarchistic and violent of the many strands of the Zengakuren at the present time. The Sampa roundly condemns the Japan Communist Party (JCP) for its stuffiness and bureaucracy, and attacks most Communist countries on the same grounds. In recent months it has been at the van of the following strug-

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 551

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.