Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan

By J. A. A. Stockwin | Go to book overview

First published in Asian and African Studies (Journal of the Israel Oriental Society), Vol. 18, No. 1, March 1984


29

The Occupation: Continuity or Change?

This revolution of the spirit among the Japanese people represents no thin veneer to serve the purposes of the present. It represents an unparalleled convulsion in the social history of the world (General MacArthur, 2 September 1946). 1

The worst thing possible about Japanese politics today is the fact that the same class of people who led and guided the mistaken war policies of Japan from the start of the Showa period still continue in positions of power-overbearing in their arrogance and stubborn in their refusal to reflect upon the past. Like the suppurating roots of carious teeth, these people exude an offensive stench…. The stench of these rotting teeth rises to the high heavens (Utsunomiya Tokuma, April 1969). 2

AT FIRST SIGHT these two statements may seem little more than extreme examples of hyperbolic political rhetoric. Both, in their own ways, however, are equally astonishing. Did General MacArthur, Supreme Commander, Allied Powers, really believe that the Occupation of Japan had the momentous significance that he suggested? And did Utsunomiya, the long-serving maverick Diet Member, who for much of his career had been affiliated with the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), really mean that the leaders of his own party were just as bad as those Japanese leaders who had brought war and destruction to Japan up to 1945? No doubt both these men believed their rhetoric at the time they uttered it, though whether either would have given vent to quite these sentiments after a period of mature and sober reflection is another matter.

In extreme form, however, they each represent polar views of the achievements and significance of the allied Occupation of Japan. Boiled down to essentials, the first statement says that the Occupation wrought fundamental change, that Japan would never be the same again, that the experience was essentially revolutionary. The second statement, in contrast, essentially expresses the view that the old guard won out, that revolution was avoided or defeated, that continuity is more prevalent than change.

-374-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 551

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.