The United States and Brazil: A Long Road of Unmet Expectations

By Monica Hirst | Go to book overview

NOTES

NOTES FOR CHAPTER 1

1.
In the Americas, Brazil's territorial size stands third after Canada and the United States, while its population and economy (gross domestic product) stands second, after the United States.
2.
Bradford Burns, The Unwritten Alliance: Rio Branco and the Brazilian-American Relations (New York: Columbia University Press, 1966).
3.
Despite vigorous U.S. protectionism at this time, Brazil was assured tariff exemptions or reductions for many of its U.S.-bound products, particularly coffee. In turn, Brazil reciprocated by lowering its tariffs on U.S. products by a range of 20 to 30 percent.
4.
Between the years 1914 and 1928, U.S. participation in Brazilian imports grew from 14 to 26 percent. The goods destined for Brazil included automobiles and accessories, wheat, gas, steam engines, cement, and electronic machines and appliances.
5.
Gerson Moura, Autonomia na Dependência. A Política Externa Brasileira de 1935 à 1942 (Rio de Janeiro: Nova Fronteira, 1980).
6.
Mônica A. Hirst, “Era Vargas, ” in História das Relações Internacionais do Brasil, ed. Raul Mendes Silva and Clóvis Brigagão (Rio de Janeiro: CEBRI/Petrobrás, 2001).
7.
Under this provision of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, the president is required to take all appropriate action, including retaliation, to obtain the removal of any act, policy, or practice of a foreign government that violates an international agreement or is unjustifiable, unreasonable, or discriminatory, and burdens or restricts U.S. commerce. In practice, this provision has been employed increasingly on behalf of American exporters fighting foreign import barriers or subsidized competition in foreign markets.

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The United States and Brazil: A Long Road of Unmet Expectations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Preface ix
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Historical Background 1
  • Chapter 2 - New Complexities in U.S.-Brazil Economic Relations 19
  • Chapter 3 - U.S.-Brazil Political Relations 39
  • Chapter 4 - Balance and Perspectives 67
  • Chapter 5 - The United States and Brazil: Comparative Reflections 73
  • Notes 109
  • Index 123
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