Higher Education and Opinion Making in Twentieth-Century England

By Harold Silver | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I am indebted to the archivists and staff of the following institutions for invaluable assistance: the University of London Institute of Education (for the Moot papers); the University of Birmingham (for the Student Christian Movement); the University of Liverpool (for the E. Allison Peers/'Bruce Truscot' and Sir James Mountford papers); the Royal Society (for Sir Eric [Lord]Ashby); the Special Collections Library, Queen's University of Belfast (for Sir Eric Ashby); the John Rylands University Library, University of Manchester (for Sir Walter Moberly); the Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick (for the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals); the University of Keele (for the A.D. [Lord] Lindsay papers); Manchester Archives and Local Studies (for Ernest [Lord] Simon).

I would also like to acknowledge the following: Professor Michael Ashby, for help concerning sources for Eric Ashby; Professor Leslie Clarkson, for help with sources regarding Eric Ashby at Queen's University, Belfast; Sir John Moberly, for help regarding Sir Walter Moberly; Professor Ann Mackenzie, for encouragement in pursuit of 'Bruce Truscot'; Stephen Court for help regarding E. Allison Peers's membership of the Association of University Teachers.

Crucial help was provided from other sources: The Nuffield Foundation, from whom a Social Sciences Small Grant made possible many of the visits essential for this research. The Rockefeller Foundation and its Bellagio Study Center, Italy, which provided, after ten years, a much appreciated second period of residence and the ideal working conditions in which some of the chapters were drafted. The University of Plymouth, its Faculty of Arts and Education and particularly Professor Andrew Hannan, for support that a visiting professor may not always receive, but which in this case has been forthcoming and warmly welcomed. Professor Peter Gordon, for important encouragement and help.

Pam, as always.

Versions of the chapters on Bruce Truscot and Eric Ashby have appeared in History of Education, vols 28 (1999) and 32 (2002) respectively.

Oxford, 2003

-vii-

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Higher Education and Opinion Making in Twentieth-Century England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Foreword xi
  • Part I - System Making 1
  • 1 - Preludes 3
  • 2 - Early Decades: 'Unequal and Inadequate' 13
  • 3 - 1940s: 'A New Crispness' 33
  • Part II - Values 55
  • 4 - 'truscot': 'the Universities' Speaking Conscience' 57
  • 5 - Postwar: 'A Ferment of Thought' 79
  • 6 - Moberly: 'the Status Quo and Its Defects' 100
  • 7 - 1950s: 'Modern Needs' 127
  • 8 - Ashby: 'the Age of Technology' 151
  • Part III - A National Purpose 175
  • 9 - 1960s: 'Expansionism' 177
  • 10 - Final Decades: 'Painful Transformation' 211
  • 11 - Pressures and Silences 252
  • Index 267
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