Higher Education and Opinion Making in Twentieth-Century England

By Harold Silver | Go to book overview

2

EARLY DECADES: 'UNEQUAL AND INADEQUATE'

INVENTING TRADITION

The general attitude of the public towards the universities', wrote a contributor to the Nineteenth Century in 1901, 'is that they are more or less of luxuries, to diffuse a smattering of general culture and to give a tone to, or label with a degree, a favoured few of our countrymen'. American public opinion had 'awakened to the enormous importance of the development of universities', and the future of England depended on a similar awakening. 1 At the end of the nineteenth century England had its handful of universities, and a few more were about to appear. Luxuries for the favoured few were not just a perception. At the end of the 1920s the Principal of the University of Birmingham could write that 'the average citizen of to-day has very hazy ideas of what a university is and what it ought to be'. 2

Growth there was in these initial decades of the century, but the literature on the universities addressed primarily the importance and potential of the small number of recent university and college foundations, plans and ideas for more, and proposals for the reform of Oxford and Cambridge. Luxuries and hazy ideas do not accurately describe the aims and practices of all the universities in this period, or the notions of all 'average citizens'. There were no echoing pronouncements of the kind associated with Newman, Mill or Huxley in the previous century. The voices of higher education in the first three decades of the twentieth century were carried through published speeches, articles, pamphlets-the ephemera of politics and advocacy. They spoke out of the processes of plotting and planning, local reports and national politics. There were also the brief and often self-congratulatory early accounts of the 'new' universities and biographies of their founding fathers, as well as addresses on how they were addressing 'the university problem'. Bristol, for example, engendered two such publications in 1906 and 1918; Liverpool one in 1903, three in 1907. Birmingham published a collection of lectures,

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Higher Education and Opinion Making in Twentieth-Century England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Foreword xi
  • Part I - System Making 1
  • 1 - Preludes 3
  • 2 - Early Decades: 'Unequal and Inadequate' 13
  • 3 - 1940s: 'A New Crispness' 33
  • Part II - Values 55
  • 4 - 'truscot': 'the Universities' Speaking Conscience' 57
  • 5 - Postwar: 'A Ferment of Thought' 79
  • 6 - Moberly: 'the Status Quo and Its Defects' 100
  • 7 - 1950s: 'Modern Needs' 127
  • 8 - Ashby: 'the Age of Technology' 151
  • Part III - A National Purpose 175
  • 9 - 1960s: 'Expansionism' 177
  • 10 - Final Decades: 'Painful Transformation' 211
  • 11 - Pressures and Silences 252
  • Index 267
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.