Revisiting Racialized Voice: African American Ethos in Language and Literature

By David G. Holmes | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
See Erich Segal's introduction to The Dialogues of Plato, Bantam ed.
2.
The simultaneous elevation of inspiration and denigration of invention are key concepts in W. Ross Winterowd's work.
3.
For a more detailed discussion of the One Mind, consult the section en- titled “Consciousness” in ch. 1 of Matthiessen 5—14.

1. The Color of Literacy: Race, Self, and the Public Ethos
1.
Sundquist's first chapter in To Wake the Nations remains among the best scholarship on Douglass. Particularly engaging is Sundquist's argument regard- ing how Douglass seeks to revise societal perceptions of his own racial identity as well as the slave insurrections, so that the Americanness of both enterprises becomes evident.
2.
See William L. Andrews's introduction to Critical Essays on Frederick Douglass and John Blassingame's introduction to The Frederick Douglass Pa- pers, vol. 1.
3.
Heteroglossia, a pivotal theoretical term in Bakhtin's work, is predictably among the most difficult of his concepts to grasp. The reader is encouraged, therefore, to consult Bakhtin's Dialogic Imagination in its entirety.

2. From Reading Race to Race as a Way of Reading
1.
I adapt the idea “race as a hermeneutic” from Uzo Esonwanne. There are, however, a few principal differences between his use of the phrase and mine. For example, he is concerned neither with replacing the metaphor of race as a text with race as a hermeneutic nor with the implications of race as a herme- neutic for constructing authorship generally and for composition theory spe- cifically. Moreover, although Esonwanne begins suggesting a basis for cultural critique, his analysis is more philosophical, global, and less taken with rethinking American social history than is mine. Most important, he does not expose the fallacies associated with other figurative readings of race. See Esonwanne.
2.
See the first chapter of Stanton and ch. 3 of Gossett.
3.
The cursory discussion that unfolds here is largely taken from Thomas F. Gossett's and William Stanton's respective treatises. In ch. 4 of his book, Gossett provides a more focused treatment of the rise of the polygenetic view than

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