Images of the Hunter in American Life and Literature

By Lynda Wolfe Coupe | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I owe a great debt to so many people for supporting me through the process that ultimately resulted in this book. The topic of my dissertation upon which the book is based was inspired by my husband, John Coupe. Hunting and fishing with him has immersed me in the life of the woods where I have experienced the moments of clarity and self-knowledge that I describe in my discussion of hunter figures.

William Kelly, my adviser at CUNY, was indefatigable in editing my dissertation and urged me on with his kind but rigorous comments. I also wish to thank my dissertation committee, Joan Richardson and David Reynolds.

My editor, Debora Lyne, has been tireless in her meticulous work on the many drafts and endless revisions of the book manuscript. Her efficiency and good nature have rallied me through many setbacks.

My friends and colleagues at Pace University also contributed much appreciated moral and practical support over many years. Becky Martin, Ruth Anne Thompson, and Joe Franco assured me that completing the dissertation and the degree was indeed possible. Mike Gillen has been a wonderful colleague and mentor from whom I have learned valuable administrative skills. Bob Klaeger has kept me working in the Department of Literature and Communications so that I may pursue my love of teaching as well as writing.

My siblings, Sue, Gail, and Walt, have believed in me more than I could ever believe in myself. Of course, my mother, Evelyn Wolfe, is my hero. She has persevered through personal and health crises and continues to do so with rare strength and grace. I am just sorry my father, Donald Adams, did not live to see the publication of this book. I also wish to thank my many friends for their support, especially Donna D'Angelo, who was so happy for me when I told her the book had been accepted for publication.

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