Images of the Hunter in American Life and Literature

By Lynda Wolfe Coupe | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

Ike McCaslin and Ernest Hemingway: Nostalgia and Degeneration

It was ... the men, not white nor black nor red, but men, hunters with the will and hardihood to endure and the humility and skill to survive, ... only hunters [who] drank, drinking not of the blood they had spilled but some condensation of the wild immortal spirit, drinking it moderately, humbly even, not with the pagan's base hope of acquiring the virtues and cunning and strength and speed, but in salute to them. (Faulkner, “The Bear, ” qtd. in Utley, Bloom, and Kinney 162— 163)

I was beginning to feel strong again ... and it was a pleasure to walk in the easy rolling country, ... to hunt, not knowing what we might see and free to shoot the meat we needed.... I loved the country so that I was happy as you are after you have been with a woman that you really love.... Now, being in Africa, I was hungry for more of it. (Hemingway, Green Hills of Africa 51, 72—73)

After World War I, figures of the hunter and the hunt represent attempts to recapture a simpler, more pristine world. Hunter figures like William Faulkner's Ike McCaslin in “The Bear” and Ernest Hemingway in his life and his fiction seek personal definition and a system of values that can only be found away from the modern world. The wild worlds of the woods and the jungle are sites where moments of clarity and self-realization take place. Between World War I and World War II, the hunter as deployed by both Faulkner and Hemingway is a nostalgic figure who bridges the gap between the troubled present and an idealized past.

Faulkner's Ike McCaslin suggests the possibility of reconciling the wrongs of the past through immersion in nature and participation in the hunting ritual. He relies on Sam Fathers, who acts as Ike's spiritual father, to advise him in the ways of the wilderness. Part Native American and part black, Fathers amalgamates the marginalized elements of American culture in his character. He is a dignified and uncorrupted man who steers Ike toward self-knowledge.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Images of the Hunter in American Life and Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 211

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.