Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation, and Subjectivity

By Julian Henriques; Wendy Hollway et al. | Go to book overview

1

Fitting work: psychological assessment in organizations

Wendy Hollway

Occupational assessment is conventionally seen as one area of application of those parts of the science of psychology which measure and evaluate individuals and differentiate between them for the purposes of prediction and control of behaviour. In this chapter I want to examine occupational assessment from a rather different point of view. Analytically speaking, occupational assessment demonstrates the relations between power and knowledge (see pp. 115 ff.). Practically speaking, it shows psychology in action as a 'technology of the social'. These are perspectives drawn from Foucault's approach (which is developed fully in the Introduction to section 2). By the term 'technology of the social', I am not denoting technology in the conventional applied psychological sense of the hardware of psychological methods, with the neutrality that this implies. Rather it ties in with our emphasis-as outlined in the Introduction-on psychology's part in the processes of social regulation which are so central to modern social organization (see the Introduction to section 2, p. 106 for an elaboration of this usage within discourse theory). A technology of the social has its effects because it is legitimized by social science knowledge. Reciprocally the knowledge is a historical product of certain practices. This is what Foucault means by the mutuality of the powerknowledge relation (see the Introduction to section 2, especially pp. 100 ff.). Thus a 'knowledge' is not a body of truth as science would have it, but a historical product of certain practices, such as 'technologies of the social'. It is in this sense that I talk about the knowledges that make up psychology, rather than talking about psychology as a discipline. It is worth pointing out that power should not automatically connote something negative; something linked with oppressive practices. In a

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation, and Subjectivity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.