The Long Eighth Century

By Inge Lyse Hansen; Chris Wickham | Go to book overview

SOME CONSIDERATIONS ON THE COINAGE
OF LOMBARD AND CAROLINGIAN ITALY
Alessia Rovelli*

Among the provinces which constituted the western Roman empire, Italy had a particular destiny, and not just because of its centrality in the Mediterranean region: the kingdom of Theoderic, far from representing a break, explicitly described itself as a restoration of the ancient Roman order; the Justinianic conquest further reinforced connections with the Roman-Byzantine tradition. Italy's “Mediterranean vocation”decisively influenced the process of its transformation from the late antique to the medieval era. Nor was this vocation eradicated by the Lombard invasion, however violent it might have been; and it probably explains, at least in part, the marginal character that Italian Carolingian coin issues seem to have had, when compared with those of other more central regions of the Frankish empire.

The weight of Roman-Byzantine tradition is particularly evident in the evolution of the monetary systems adopted in Italy, which, as we shall see, followed different paths from the coinages of the other Roman-barbarian kingdoms, except, in part, in the use of bronze coinage.1 In northern Italy, conquered by the Lombards in 568, the

____________________
1
On monetary production and circulation in the Ostrogthic era, which lies outside the chronological limits of this study, see E.A. Arslan, “La monetazione dei Goti”, XXXVI Corso di cultura sull'arte ravennate e bizantina (Ravenna, 1989), pp. 17–72; E.A. Arslan, “La struttura delle emissioni monetarie dei Goti in Italia”, Teodorico e i Goti d'Italia. Atti del XIII Congresso internazionale di studi sull'alto Medioevo (Spoleto, 1993), pp. 517–53. For regional studies: E. Ercolani Cocchi, “La circolazione monetale fra tardo antico e alto medioevo: dagli scavi di Villa Clelia”, Studi romagnoli 29 (1978), pp. 367–99; E. Ercolani Cocchi, “Il circolante divisionale a Ravenna, fra la fine del V e gli inizi del VI sec. d. C.”, in P. Kos and Z. Demo eds., Studia Numismatica Labacensia Alexandro Jelo';nik oblata (Ljubljana, 1988), pp. 43–52; G. Gorini, “Moneta e scambi nel Veneto altomedievale”, in A. Castagnetti and G.M. Varanini eds., Il Veneto nel Medioevo. Dalla “Venetia”alla Marca Veronese (Verona, 1989), pp. 167–97.
*
In writing this article I have been able to benefit from many friendly discussions with Ermanno Arslan, whom I thank for also having provided me with vital information from unpublished material. I am grateful to Marios Costambeys for translating this article.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Long Eighth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.