The Bible in Africa: Transactions, Trajectories, and Trends

By Gerald O. West; Musa W. Dube | Go to book overview

AFRICAN PERSPECTIVES ON POVERTY IN
THE HEBREW LAW CODES
Robert Wafawanaka

The idea of poverty is something with which most traditional Africans are familiar. Africans have endured generations of grinding poverty, but they have somehow managed to survive it. Poverty is an issue which Africans can relate to directly, based on their own experiences. To Africans, poverty is real, material, and economic. It may be due to a lack of sufficient material resources, unemployment, or lack of opportunity, but is equally due to exploitation, oppression, and other forms of injustice at the national and international levels. The African understanding of poverty has as much to do with land as with oppression, for land is the primary economic mode of most Africans. Combined with animal husbandry, traditional Africans subsist on pastoral agricultural economies. For the African to be without livestock or land would therefore be an economic disaster. Historically, the “scramble for Africa” resulted in the appropriation of traditional lands and the displacement of Africans to infertile areas. Although scholars tend to downplay this fact, this era obviously created its own categories of the poor, as colonial governments acquired more land from the Africans. The exodus to the city in search of work not only made Africans abandon their infertile lands, but also made them work for meager wages. Therefore, compared with pre-colonial Africa, post-colonial or independent Africa saw more relatively landless people as well as poor Africans in the overcrowded cities (Illiffe 1987).

John Illiffe helps us to understand the situation of the poor in Africa with his distinction between “structural” and “conjunctural” poverty. According to him, structural poverty is “the long-term poverty of individuals due to their personal or social circumstances, and conjunctural poverty is “the temporary poverty into which ordinarily self-sufficient people may be thrown by crisis” (Illiffe 1987: 4). Illiffe distinguishes between the structural poverty characteristic of societies with land and those without land. In land-rich societies, the very poor are characteristically whose who lack access to the labor

-490-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Bible in Africa: Transactions, Trajectories, and Trends
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 828

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.