The Bible in Africa: Transactions, Trajectories, and Trends

By Gerald O. West; Musa W. Dube | Go to book overview

AFRICA IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
Knut Holter

Africa in the Old Testament, to many Old Testament readers, in Africa as well as outside, this topic may sound rather exotic. Few have thought of the idea that the ancient texts of the Old Testament have anything to say about Africa. However, to other readers, mainly in Africa or in the African diaspora, this topic touches existential questions, the place of Africa in the Old Testament is related to their identity as well as their history. Accordingly, whether the topic is seen as exotic or existential, depends on the eyes that see. The present essay acknowledges this and takes sides, it is consciously written from the perspective that a closer study of what the ancient texts of the Old Testament say about Africa is of importance for its contemporary African readers.

The presentation and discussion of the topic Africa in the Old Testament will be done in three steps. First, an introductory section, which aims to clarify some definitions and the background and material of this enterprise. Then follows the major section, which makes a textual survey of how some African nations and even some African individuals are portrayed throughout the Old Testament. And finally, a brief summary of the findings, noting some hermeneutical questions.

Let us start with a definition of the two terms “Old Testament” and “Africa.” First, while the term “Old Testament” may seem relatively unproblematic (except to those who would prefer the designation “Hebrew Bible, ” though this is seldom used in Africa), referring in the minds of most scholars to the Masoretic canon, this understanding is not without problems, as no less than two broader canons, competing with the Masoretic one, have their background in Africa: The Alexandrian and the Ethiopian. Just what constitutes the Old Testament, has been problematised, and some have argued that African translations of the Old Testament and hence also African interpretations of the Old Testament should follow the broader African canons (Kealy 1979: 13–26). I raise this concern, but will not develop it. My focus is on the second term, “Africa.” The term “Africa” usually designates the African continent. But this understanding is not

-569-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Bible in Africa: Transactions, Trajectories, and Trends
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 828

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.