Democracy in Immigrant America: Changing Demographics and Political Participation

By S. Karthick Ramakrishnan | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1
1.
Even in the case of amnesty, negotiations with Mexico were under way in January 2002 to provide a limited form of legalization for undocumented work- ers from Mexico (Slevin and Sheridan 2002).
2.
For a more detailed overview of this literature, see Chapter 4.

CHAPTER 2
1.
It should be noted that Milton Gordon's notion of immigrant adaptation is different from Oscar Handlin's in one significant respect: Handlin posits that institutions and practices from the Old World are irrelevant to life in the United States but that it still takes some time for immigrants to cope with life in the United States. On the other hand, Gordon argues that immigrant groups often retain traditional structures and customs, which in turn helps determine the pace at which cultural assimilation proceeds.
2.
The same is also true of Nathan Glazer and Daniel Patrick Moynihan's Be- yond the Melting Pot (1963), which provides an analysis of political power among different ethnic groups in New York City. In the book, Glazer and Moynihan pay attention to party allegiance and office holding but do not ex- amine differences in the extent of voting participation per se.
3.
Women of all ethnic groups (including native-born “Yankees”) had low levels of registration until the mid-1930s. According to Gamm (1989), what changed during the New Deal for Jewish immigrants was that they switched from party registration along class lines (working-class Jews were registered Democrats, whereas upper-class Jews were Republicans) to registering and vot- ing solidly with the Democratic Party.
4.
There is also an extensive literature on border crossing among undocu-

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