Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament

By Joan Comay | Go to book overview

B

BABA RABBAH (Baba the Great)

4th century. Samaritan high priest. Baba's rule marked a golden age for the Samaritans. He fought for Samaritan freedom against the Roman forces and on several occasions succeeded in driving them out of his territory. He kept a standing army of some three thousand men and organized the country into twelve districts. He built new synagogues and reopened others that had been closed by the Romans, and encouraged literature. All the ancient books of the Samaritans were gathered together for preservation and copying. It is in this period of religious and cultural revival that the Defter, the Samaritan prayer book, was begun. Baba organized a council of four laymen and three priests who toured the country to ensure the education of the people in the Torah, as well as to decide difficult halachic questions. Legend relates how after forty years of rule the Byzantine emperor summoned him to Constantinople to conclude a peace treaty. Once there, he was treated with all honour, but not allowed to return.


BABATA

2nd century. Housewife of En-Gedi. In 1960 Israel archaeologists, with the help of the army, explored all the caves in the cliffs and wadis overlooking the Dead Sea, in the vicinity of the oasis of En-Gedi ('Spring of the Goat'). Using ropes, they reached the entrance of a cave containing skeletons and belongings, dating back to the crushing of the BAR-KOCHBA revolt against the Romans in 135. Among the finds in the cave were Bar-Kochba's letters to the defenders of En-Gedi and, within a leather pouch, a bundle of legal documents. There were thirty-five in all, written on papyrus in Greek, Aramaic and Nabatean. They included marriage certificates, title deeds to properties, court papers-all of absorbing interest to historians of the period. From them there has been reconstructed the life and concerns of Babata, a formidable Judean matron of the 2 century, who met her death in the last flicker of Jewish national independence before the present time.

Babata was the daughter of Simeon ben-Menachem and his wife Miriam, a Jewish couple living in Mahoza at the southern end of the Dead Sea, that had been Nabatean territory before the Roman occupation. Her father acquired date palm groves and other property in Mahoza, which were deeded by way of gift to his wife and then inherited by his daughter.

Babata was an unlettered woman, but shrewd and litigious. Her first husband was Yeshua ben-Joseph, by whom she had a son also called Yeshua. When her husband died, two guardians were appointed for the boy, one Jewish and one Nabatean, and a sum of money was given to them in trust for the orphan's maintenance. In 125 she issued a summons against the guardians, calling on them to appear before the Roman governor and surrender the trust fund to her, alleging they had failed to provide for the maintenance.

In due course Babata married again, to one Yehuda from En-Gedi. When he died, she became involved in compli

-34-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vi
  • Author''s Preface vii
  • Glossary viii
  • Chronology xi
  • World Jewish Population in 1993 xxxv
  • A 1
  • B 34
  • C 76
  • D 90
  • E 107
  • F 125
  • G 137
  • H 152
  • I 181
  • J 187
  • K 211
  • L 223
  • M 241
  • N 271
  • O 278
  • P 282
  • R 292
  • S 318
  • T 361
  • Uv 369
  • W 372
  • Y 389
  • Z 392
  • Thematic Index 397
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.