Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament

By Joan Comay | Go to book overview

I

IBN DAUD, Abraham ben-David Halevi (Rabad I)

c. 1110-c. 1180. Spanish historian. Ibn Daud grew up in one of the Jewish communities of Arab Spain, probably Cordoba. When the Jews fled to the Christian north of the country in the wake of Andalusia's capture by the Almohads-a fierce Moslem sect who offered conversion or death-Ibn Daud left Cordoba for Toledo, and stayed there until his death. Two of his works remain: a philosophical treatise called 'The Sublime Faith', originally written in Arabic but extant only in a Hebrew version, and a historical treatise written in Hebrew called Sefer ha-Cabbala ('Book of Tradition'). 'The Sublime Faith' is a philosophical defence of Judaism, which contains an attack on the tenets of Christianity and Islam; Sefer ha-Cabbala, which covers Jewish history from the time of Alexander the Great until the Almohad invasion of Spain, is similarly a defence of Judaism. Right down to the scientific study of Jewish history in the 19 century, Sefer ha-Cabbala had a great influence, particularly as a source for the history of the Jews in Spain.


IBN EZRA, Abraham ben-Meir

c. 1089-c. 1164. Spanish poet and biblical scholar. Ibn Ezra was born in Tudela, and was closely attached to his renowned fellow-townsman Judah HALEVI. He lived in Cordova under a pseudonym, and had considerable difficulty in earning a livelihood. He wrote ironically of his ventures, 'If I were to take up shroud-making, men would leave off dying.' In legendary tales he is pictured as a beggar, seeking alms from door to door. He left the city about 1140 and after that lived as a wandering scholar, mainly in Italy, also visiting France, North Africa, London and maybe Palestine in his old age.

Ibn Ezra's works of biblical exegesis, intended to give the simple meaning of the Torah, were composed in Italy. It was through these works that the fruits of Spanish philosophy were spread outside Spain. An astronomer and mathematician, he is considered the first scientific commentator on the Bible, and centuries later SPINOZA was inspired by his work.

He also produced poetry, both religious and secular; treatises on Hebrew grammar for the instruction of the Italian communities; short philosophical works; and works on astronomy and mathematics-including a decimal system for writing numbers.


IBN EZRA, Moses

c. 1055-1138. Spanish philosopher and linguist. Ibn Ezra was born in Granada, and became the chief literary authority among Spanish Jews in his time. He left his native city soon after 1091, some say because of a disappointment in love, but it is more than likely that his departure coincided with the capture of Granada by the Moslem Almoravids. Although they were not noted as religious fanatics, as were the Almohads, the new rulers proceeded to settle the town with Moslems. Under the previous Moslem dynasty, the town had been inhabited largely by Jews.

Until his death, Moses wandered

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vi
  • Author''s Preface vii
  • Glossary viii
  • Chronology xi
  • World Jewish Population in 1993 xxxv
  • A 1
  • B 34
  • C 76
  • D 90
  • E 107
  • F 125
  • G 137
  • H 152
  • I 181
  • J 187
  • K 211
  • L 223
  • M 241
  • N 271
  • O 278
  • P 282
  • R 292
  • S 318
  • T 361
  • Uv 369
  • W 372
  • Y 389
  • Z 392
  • Thematic Index 397
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.