Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament

By Joan Comay | Go to book overview

N

NACHMAN ben-Simchah of Bratislav

1772-1811. Ukrainian chassidic rabbi. Nachman was descended from ISRAEL BEN-ELIEZER BA'ALSHEM TOV, the founder of Chassidism. A mystic and ascetic, he practised prolonged fasts, followed by days in which he isolated himself in meditation in forests and fields. He was married to the daughter of a rabbi when thirteen years old, and from the age of eighteen he and his growing family lived in great poverty. In 1798, practically penniless, he set out alone for the Holy Land, where he spent most of his time with mystical scholars in Tiberias and Safad. Family responsibilities called him home and in 1802 he settled in Bratislav, Podolia. After suffering from tuberculosis for over three years, he died in the town of Uman.

An intuitive man, Nachman elevated instinctive belief above scholarship; he despised philosophers and mistrusted physicians. His Chassidim practised confession of their sins before him. Some other chassidic groups were strongly opposed to his teachings, even accusing him of following the doctrines of SHABBETAI ZEVI.

Nachman was a gifted story-teller. His largely allegorical Yiddish narratives have been printed in Yiddish and Hebrew in many editions, and were disseminated in Western Europe through the versions of Martin BUBER.


NACHMANIDES (Rabbi Moses ben-Nachman, known as Ramban)

1194-1270. Spanish rabbi and scholar, Nachmanides, whose Spanish name was Bonastrug da Porta, directed a rabbinical academy in his home town of Gerona and may have been chief rabbi of Catalonia from 1264. He became recognized as the leader of Spanish Jewry and the outstanding Jewish scholar of his day.

In 1263, on the command of King James I of Aragon, Nachmanides participated in a public debate in Barcelona on the merits of Judaism and Christianity. The only Jew opposing a group of 250 Christians, Nachmanides defended his thesis so well that the king declared him the victor and presented him with a prize of 300 dinars. Urged to do so by the bishop of Gerona, Nachmanides summed up his arguments in a book, Sefer ha-Vikuach (The Book of the Debate'). Yet the Dominican friars who had organized the dispute brought Nachmanides to trial for blasphemy. His right to free speech in the disputation was upheld by the king, so the angry Dominicans turned to the pope. When the latter directed the king to punish Nachmanides, the Jewish scholar fled to Palestine, arriving at the port of Acre in the summer of 1267. Here too his spiritual authority was acknowledged. His place of burial is unknown.

About fifty of his many works are still extant, and show his great talmudic learning, his knowledge of the newly emerging mystical science (the Cabbala) and his grasp of general sciences. His writings on the interpretation of the Torah and on the Cabbala strongly influenced succeeding scholars and Cabbalists.


NAMIER (Bernstein-Namierowski) Sir Lewis

1888-1960. Historian and Zionist.

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.