Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament

By Joan Comay | Go to book overview

R

RABBAH, bar-Nachamani

c. 270-c. 321. Babylonian amora. Rabbah was one of the most famous Babylonian amoraim and for twenty-two years was head of the academy of Pumbedita. He was a descendant of Eli, the high priest (I Sam.) on whom a curse rested, and Rabbah's early death was attributed to this cause.

Rabbah may have been in Palestine for a short time, studying under JO-CHANAN BEN-NAPPACHA at Tiberias. He was a popular teacher and usually began his lectures with a witty or amus-ing remark to put his pupils at ease. Under his leadership the standing of the Pumbedita academy rose to great heights, but though pupils flocked there to study under him, he was extremely unpopular with the citizens of the town, whose behaviour he constantly criticized. They in turn informed on him to the authorities when he advised twelve hundred people not to pay their taxes, and he was forced to flee. He wandered around in the forest near Pumbedita and his body was eventually found shielded from the wild animals, it is said, by the wings of birds.


RABBENU

see TAM, Jacob ben-Meir.


RABI, Isidor Isaac

1898-1988. US physicist and Nobel laureate, 1944. Rabi, a professor at Columbia University, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in measuring the magnetic properties of atoms and molecules, using the molecular beam method.

During World War II he was involved in the development of radar, and in the atom bomb project. Later, he helped to construct the first cyclotron. After the war he served as chairman of the advisory committee to the Atomic Energy Commission (1952-6), and as a member of the United Nations Science Committee. He was on the board of governors of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel.


RABIN, Yitzhak

b. 1922. Israeli politician. Rabin was born in Jerusalem and educated in Palestine and at the Staff College in England. He commanded a brigade of the Palmach from 1943-8 through the War of Independence and was a representative of the Israeli Defence forces at the Rhodes armistice negotiation. He continued his army career, becoming commander-in-chief of the Northern Command in 1956, the head of the manpower branch in 1959, the deputy chief of staff in 1960 and the chief of staff from 1964-8. He must be therefore regarded as largely responsible for the great victory of the Six-Day War.

In 1968 he became Israeli ambassador to the United States and in 1974 he was elected to the Knesset. From 1974-7 he was leader of the Labour Party and also prime minister in succession to Golda MEIR. He resigned as a result of a scandal: his wife had technically breached the currency regulations. In 1984, in the Labour-Likud coalition, he served as minister of defence. In 1992 he again became leader of the Labour Party and prime minister and under his government a peace settlement was negotiated with King HUSSEIN of Jordan, and with

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Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vi
  • Author''s Preface vii
  • Glossary viii
  • Chronology xi
  • World Jewish Population in 1993 xxxv
  • A 1
  • B 34
  • C 76
  • D 90
  • E 107
  • F 125
  • G 137
  • H 152
  • I 181
  • J 187
  • K 211
  • L 223
  • M 241
  • N 271
  • O 278
  • P 282
  • R 292
  • S 318
  • T 361
  • Uv 369
  • W 372
  • Y 389
  • Z 392
  • Thematic Index 397
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