Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930

By Eric Anderson; Alfred A. Moss Jr. | Go to book overview

1

The African American Agenda
for Education

[The] man who holds that all I need is to be a good servant is not fit to teach me.

—Charles Grandison 1.

ven before the Emancipation Proclamation, as northern reform- Evers and missionaries began creating schools for African Americans, southern blacks sought education with an enthusiasm that amazed white observers. From the start, black students and parents registered their own distinctive demands and expectations. They were confident that schools would provide them and their children the skills necessary to develop racial pride, economic mobility, and political freedom. Without waiting for white encouragement, blacks sought to administer Negro schools, staff them with teachers of their own race, and supplement outside philanthropy with community self-help. 2.

So persistently did black southerners seek a voice in their own education in the late nineteenth century that it is possible to speak of an African American agenda in education, though in fact the most consistent black demand was that their education should be

____________________
1.
American Association of Educators of Colored Youth, Minutes of Meeting Held at Baltimore, July 24—27, 1895, 9.
2.
Joe M. Richardson, Christian Reconstruction: The American Missionary Association and Southern Blacks: 1861—1890; Robert C. Morris, “Educational Reconstruction, 144, 147, 151; Robert C. Morris, Reading, `Riting, and Reconstruction: The Education of Freedmen in the South, 1861—1870, 1—14, 17, 22, 120—21; Robert C. Sherer, Subordination or Liberation?: The Development and Conflicting Theories of Education in Nineteenth Century Alabama, 2; Ronald E. Butchart, Northern Schools, Southern Blacks, and Reconstruction: Freedmen's Education, 1862—1875, 175, 177; James M. Smallwood, “Early 'Freedom Schools': Black Self-Help and Education in Reconstruction Texas, A Case Study, 790; Jacqueline Jones, Soldiers of Light and Love: Northern Teachers and Georgia Blacks, 1865— 1873, 61—86, 84.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.