The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783

By A. T. Mahan | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER VI.
THE REGENCY IN FRANCE. -- ALBERONI IN SPAIN. -- POLICIES OF WALPOLE AND FLEURI. -- WAR OF THE POLISH SUCCESSION. -- ENGLISH CONTRABAND TRADE IN SPANISH AMERICA. -- GREAT BRITAIN DECLARES WAR AGAINST SPAIN. -- 1715-1739.

THE Peace of Utrecht was soon followed by the deaths of the rulers of the two countries which had played the foremost part in the War of the Spanish Succession. Queen Anne died August 1, 1714; Louis XIV. on the 1st of September, 1715.

The successor to the English throne, the German George I., though undoubtedly the choice of the English people, was far from being their favorite, and was rather endured as a necessary evil, giving them a Protestant instead of a Roman Catholic king. Along with the coldness and dislike of his own partisans, he found a very considerable body of disaffected men, who wished to see the son of James II. on the throne. There was therefore a lack of solidity, more apparent than real, but still real, in his position. In France, on the contrary, the succession to the throne was undisputed; but the heir was a child of five years, and there was much jealousy as to the possession of the regency, a power more absolute than that of the King of England. The regency was obtained and exercised by the next in succession to the throne, Philip, Duke of Orleans; but he had to apprehend, not only attempts on the part of rivals in France to shake his hold, but also the active enmity of the Bourbon king of Spain, Philip V., -- an enmity which seems to have dated from an intrigue of Orleans, during the late war, to supplant Philip on the Spanish throne. There was therefore

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