Why Are Artists Poor? The Exceptional Economy of the Arts

By Hans Abbing | Go to book overview

Chapter10
Art Serves the Government How Symbiotic Is the Relationship between Art and the State?

How the Veiled Purchase of a Mondrian Painting became the Center of Public Debate

In 1998 the Dutch National Bank bought a Mondrian painting for 36 million
Euros and gave it to the Dutch people. Journalists found out that the pur
chase had been handled behind closed doors using intermediaries and
that a special arrangement had been used because the deal had not been
entirely legal. The `gift' from the bank to the Dutch people came from public
money; therefore, parliament should have been asked for permission to
spend this money on the purchase of the painting. The elected representa
tives of the Dutch people must be able to decide what the Dutch are going
to give themselves. The Prime Minister, who had known about the deal all
along, admitted that he thought that parliament would have never con
sented to the deal. Therefore, a `minor' disingenuous procedure and some
concealment had been required. The intention of the government and the
bank director had only been to do something `nice' for the country.

While the gift was meant to be public, the deal had to remain veiled. When it
finally became public, a row ensued and the public reacted particularly
negatively. The people were not happy with the gift because they did not
like Mondrian's painting.

Alex remembers that he and his friends had mixed feelings about the affair.
They liked the painting very much, although they thought that it had cost far
too much money. But that wasn't their main issue.

Alex's colleague Rosa had the most extreme opinion. `I like this Mondrian,
but I could never accept it as a gift. The president of the bank is a thief; he
gives away what is not his to give. He is more than just a petty criminal. This
so-called gift comes from a theft worth think of it eighty million guilders.
For that money a thousand visual artists could paint murals on public build
ings for the rest of their lives.' This is what Rosa does when she has paid
work. Then Peter asked her: “How certain are you that those murals are
what the people want?” And Rosa responded, “Of course they'd rather
spend their money on bus trips to the Costa Brava, but at least their local
board representatives like my murals.”

Peter was really disgusted by the sneaky maneuvers of this fraternity of

-232-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Why Are Artists Poor? The Exceptional Economy of the Arts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 2721

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.