Dr. Sam Sheppard on Trial: The Prosecutors and the Marilyn Sheppard Murder

By Jack P. Desario; William D. Mason | Go to book overview

Nine

The Prosecutor Speaks

Finally, after nearly half a century of confusion in the public mind over the guilt of Sam Sheppard in the murder of his wife. Finally, after years— even decades—of public attacks on the integrity of the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor's Office. Finally, after weeks of legal testimony by Sam Sheppard's advocates in the newest version of this notorious case. Finally, Bill Mason and his team had the opportunity to present their perspective of the Marilyn Sheppard murder, to vindicate the careful efforts of the law enforcement community, to resolve the uncertainties surrounding the case—indeed, to shape for all time the world's perception of Dr. Sam Sheppard. Mason was determined to dispel the ugly myth that the law enforcement community somehow had conspired to get Sam Sheppard. He was determined to reveal this case for exactly what it was, a classic example of domestic homicide.

To achieve these ends Mason and his team of Prosecutors would have witnesses recount the details surrounding Marilyn Sheppard's murder and feature the extensive investigation they undertook in preparing for this case. They would also have to capture the essence of Sam Sheppard's personality and reveal his arrogance and deceit through his own statements to others as well as his trial testimony from 1954. Finally, they would have to present an impressive array of forensic experts who would refute the spurious, psuedo-scientific claims made by the Sheppard team while providing a vastly different interpretation of the evidence. It would be this interpretation of the evidence that would strongly incriminate Dr. Sam Sheppard.

The initial set of witnesses was presented by the State on Wednesday, March 8, 2000, to reconstruct the events relating to Marilyn Sheppard's murder on July 4, 1954. Mayor Spencer Houk's and Esther Houk's 1954 testimonies were read to the jury, with Dean Boland assuming the role of the 1954 attorneys, Assistant Prosecutor Tom Cahill reading the testimony of

-200-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dr. Sam Sheppard on Trial: The Prosecutors and the Marilyn Sheppard Murder
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.