The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings

By Jon R. Stone | Go to book overview

PREFACE

In a recent airing of a PBS travel program, a group of San Francisco-area college students were filmed visiting China, their ancestral home. After arriving in a wayside village, one of the women students quoted the ancient proverb, “When you drink water, remember the source, and then asserted, “That's very Chinese!” There is a similar Chinese aphorism that rebukes those who would drink from a fountain without first giving thought to the ancestor who had dug the well. In both instances, the notion is the same: we owe our lives, but also our daily conveniences, to those who came before us. Whether Chinese or American, Asian or Western, the proverb aptly applies to all. Our ancestors planted the trees whose fruits we now eat; they built the roads and bridges over which we now drive. Indeed, it is they who handed down to us the storehouse of folk wisdom that we draw upon daily to guide, enrich, and inform our lives.

For those of us who study cultural history, much of what we find in ancient proverbial wisdom centers around themes of memory and connection. Ancient wisdom encourages us to be ever mindful of our ties, as well as our obligations, to the past. The way we go in this life follows after those who came before us. “Via trita, via tuta, the old Roman adage asserts, “The beaten path is the safe path.” There is a certain comfort and assurance in knowing that the road we travel upon is a familiar one and that it will not lead us astray. The image that emerges, then, is of one generation after another following a trail blazed by revered ancestors-of following and then of passing on a tradition set down in custom as well as in word.

At the same time, the connection is not only from past to present, but also from present to future. A people's life continues onward ever mindful of their connection to their forebears, but also of what guideposts or markers they will leave for their descendants. Someday, we too will be ancestors, and the wisdom we have gleaned from our experiences will guide those who follow after us-or so we hope.

Four centuries ago, Sir Francis Bacon published De Sapientia Veterum (On the Wisdom of the Ancients), a delightful book of Classical myths and fables in which he sought to recover examples of “humane wisedome” from antiquity that had been “buried in obliuion [oblivion] and silence.” In his Preface, Bacon observed that “There is found among men a two-fold use of Parables, and those referred to contrary ends; conducing as well to foulding [folding] up and keeping of things under a vaile [veil], as to the inlightening [enlightening] and laying open of obscurities.” These Parables, he noted, must

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.