The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings

By Jon R. Stone | Go to book overview

MAIN AUTHORS CITED

Author

Dates

Type/Genre of Work

Accius (or Attius)

170-c. 86 BCE

Tragedy, Poetry

Afranius

c.160-120 BCE

Poetry, Comedy

Apuleius

c.125-? CE

Novel

St. Augustine

354-430 CE

Ecclesiastical writings

Augustus

63 BCE-14 CE

Emperor

Ausonius

c.310-395 CE

Poetry

Bacon, Sir Francis

1561-1626

Philosophy

Boëthius

c.480-524 CE

Ecclesiastical writings

Cæcilius Statius

c.219-166 BCE

Poetry

Caligula (Gaius)

12-41 CE

Emperor

Calvus

82-47 BCE

Oratory, Poetry

Cato “the Censor”

234-149 BCE

Oratory, History

Catullus

c.84-54 BCE

Poetry

Celsus

fl. c.14-37 CE

Encyclopædia

Cicero

106-43 BCE

Oratory

Claudian

c.370-404 CE

Poetry

Coke, Sir Edward

1552-1634

Jurisprudence

Cornelius Nepos

c.100-25 BCE

History

Curtius

1st Century CE

History

St. Cyprian

c.200-258 CE

Ecclesiastical writings

Dionysius Cato

c.200 CE

Ethical Prose

Domitian

51-96 CE

Emperor

Ennius

239-169 BCE

Poetry, Tragedy

Erasmus

1466-1536

Classical scholar

Florus

2nd Century CE

History

Gellius (Aulus Gellius)

c.130-180 CE

Criticism, Anecdotes

Grotius, Hugo

1583-1645

Jurisprudence

Horace

65-8 BCE

Poetry

St. Jerome (Hieronymus)

c.347-420 CE

Ecclesiastical writings

Jesus of Nazareth

c.4 BCE-30 CE

Sermons and Parables

-337-

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