Self-Evaluation in the Global Classroom

By John MacBeath; Hidenori Sugimine | Go to book overview

2

What we did

Gregor Sutherland

I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

(Confucius)

Where the Learning School began is not easy to pinpoint because it grew out of existing networks and there was no obvious beginning. Most of those who joined had been involved with the global classroom, had attended conferences or been involved in international exchanges and visits. They had the taste for international education and wanted more. Our own involvement with the Learning School began in Nara, Japan, in June 2000 at a Global Classroom Conference where, having been presented with the finding of Learning School 1 we enlisted, with enthusiasm, as co-ordinators of Learning School 2. This is not always how it begins but each year builds on the momentum of the last and by the time Learning School 3 came about, there was no shortage of volunteers.

The very first thing that happens usually with the Learning School, its real beginning, is when groups of students begin to come together from different points around the globe, assembling in Anderson High School in the dog end days of summer.


Forming groups

Some of the first thoughts which go into each Learning School project are about the members who will make up the team. One or two senior or former students are chosen by each of the participant schools to become Learning School researchers for the period of ten months. Each school has its own selection system and criteria for applicants to meet. Some schools pick their representatives on the basis of academic and linguistic ability. Other schools have very few criteria and choose students who are keen. Sometimes the criteria also includes social and personal skills. Will they be a good team player? Are they responsible enough?

Once chosen, the members are invited to make contact with each other. E-mail addresses are shared and soon the members who are going to spend so

-15-

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Self-Evaluation in the Global Classroom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Tables xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - The Learning School 3
  • 1 - The Story Begins 5
  • 2 - What We Did 15
  • 3 - Tools for Schools 27
  • 4 - A Lifetime of Learning (In One Year) 36
  • 5 - The Impact on the Schools 50
  • 6 - Expert Witnesses 65
  • Part II - Insights into the School Experience from the Learning School Students 73
  • 7 - A Place Called School 75
  • 8 - The School Day 84
  • 9 - Layouts for Learning 92
  • 10 - Subjects, Subjects, Subjects 98
  • 11 - Lessons, Lessons, Lessons 110
  • 12 - Who Do You Learn Most From? 117
  • 13 - Who Likes School? 125
  • 14 - Two Classes Compared 137
  • 15 - It All Depends on Your Point of View 149
  • 16 - A Life in the Day of Three Students 161
  • 17 - No Two the Same 175
  • 18 - Talking About Learning 183
  • 19 - Learning Out of School 203
  • 20 - Students and Their Parents 209
  • 21 - Lifelong Learning 219
  • 22 - Postscript 229
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 235
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