Self-Evaluation in the Global Classroom

By John MacBeath; Hidenori Sugimine | Go to book overview

4

A lifetime of learning (in one year)

The students of the Learning School (1 and 2)

This chapter is rich and powerful testimony to the impact of the Learning School on those who made it and lived it. It is not just a collection of personal stories, moving as many of them are, but it raises far-reaching questions about the very nature of learning and the place of schooling in the lives of students. As many of these student researchers testify, the most significant benefit of all is to make you reflect on your own learning and prepare you for further or higher education, or for life long and life-wide learning.

When I today look back on the past year I can both laugh and cry but mostly I just smile. It seems now like a faraway dream and not something I have done. It was a year of adventure in many ways and nothing one can imagine.

It was difficult to come home again and try to be 'normal' but maybe I will never be 'normal' ever again and the big question is now if I want to. It is like standing on the edge of something unknown just like it was one year ago when I was sitting on the pier in Bergen looking out at the sea and waiting for the ferry that would take me to the Shetland Islands. I am now at the same point as I was one year ago but now I do not have a big sea in front of me but my future and that feels more scary.

One thing that the Learning School did for me and probably for everyone else who has done a similar thing is that it has opened the doors in my mind, and I now believe that I can do anything. The question we all have to ask ourselves is, are we brave enough to jump out there into the unknown not knowing what we might find or would we rather stay on safe ground? One last word is, jump! It is only you who are holding yourself back. If you do not take the step out you might regret it for the rest of your life but if you do, you can always come back to safety again.

(Karolina)

This year has been a massive education to us all, an almost vertical learning curve. I often worried that I was not using this opportunity to learn as much as I could but now after having stepped back indefinitely from this particular journey I can see how by watching and feeling another culture

-36-

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Self-Evaluation in the Global Classroom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Tables xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - The Learning School 3
  • 1 - The Story Begins 5
  • 2 - What We Did 15
  • 3 - Tools for Schools 27
  • 4 - A Lifetime of Learning (In One Year) 36
  • 5 - The Impact on the Schools 50
  • 6 - Expert Witnesses 65
  • Part II - Insights into the School Experience from the Learning School Students 73
  • 7 - A Place Called School 75
  • 8 - The School Day 84
  • 9 - Layouts for Learning 92
  • 10 - Subjects, Subjects, Subjects 98
  • 11 - Lessons, Lessons, Lessons 110
  • 12 - Who Do You Learn Most From? 117
  • 13 - Who Likes School? 125
  • 14 - Two Classes Compared 137
  • 15 - It All Depends on Your Point of View 149
  • 16 - A Life in the Day of Three Students 161
  • 17 - No Two the Same 175
  • 18 - Talking About Learning 183
  • 19 - Learning Out of School 203
  • 20 - Students and Their Parents 209
  • 21 - Lifelong Learning 219
  • 22 - Postscript 229
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 235
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