Industrialization and Development: A Comparative Analysis

By Ray Kiely | Go to book overview

Chapter Five

Late industrialization and the global economy

My principal concern in this chapter is to examine the problems and opportunities faced by late industrializers in the global economy. I emphasize the specific conditions faced by late industrializers, stressing the crucial role of global factors in influencing development paths in the Third World, and how these have changed since the rise of the early developers.

These questions are examined in three sections. The first section provides a broad overview of the international division of labour from the period of early European colonial expansion until 1945, and shows how various parts of the periphery were incorporated into the world economy. The second section outlines the changes in the global economy in the period of decolonization since 1945, and documents the move towards industrialization in the Third World. The third section examines some of the theoretical approaches to the character of Third World industrialization. This section shows that there are specific opportunities and constraints faced by late industrializers, and examines debates concerning “dependent” and “independent” industrialization, and the related question of the role of transnational corporations in this process. I criticize both excessively globalist and state-centric accounts of Third World industrialization, which tend to dismiss this process as in some way distorted. Finally, as a precursor to the next chapter I suggest that while any convincing account of processes of late industrialization needs to take account of global factors, this should not be at the expense of analyzing how local factors also influence the process.


European industrialization and the international division of labour in the colonial era

European industrialization went hand in hand with the creation of a global capitalist economy. From the early sixteenth century, emerging European nations such as Spain, Portugal, and England expanded their commercial interests through a form of “mercantile imperialism”, which had largely adverse effects in the rest of the world. With the coming of the industrial age in nineteenth-century Europe, new relationships emerged between the nascent

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Industrialization and Development: A Comparative Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.