Race, Racism, and Psychology: Towards a Reflexive History

By Graham Richards | Go to book overview

Appendix

Comments on J.P. Rushton's table of 'Mongoloid', 'Caucasoid', 'Negroid' rankings
In numerous publications J.P. Rushton reproduces a table purporting to demonstrate that on a variety of physical, psychological and social measures the ranking of these is consistent with the thesis that 'Mongoloids' are 'K' reproductive strategists and 'Negroids' 'r' strategists ('Caucasoids' being intermediate). The former strategy is characterised by few offspring, high degree of parental care, slower maturation, long life, etc.; the latter by the opposites of these. The sources of the data used to arrive at these ratings are not all cited in the three versions I have available but even a cursory consideration is sufficient to raise numerous prima facie doubts about many of them.
1 Cranial capacity and brain weight at autopsy show a range between 1448 cc-1408 cc-1334 cc (capacity) 1351g-1336g-1286g (weight) for Mongoloids, Caucasoids and Negroids respectively. They were arrived at from a review of published literature of absolute scores, but it is claimed (Rushton 1990b) that taking allometry into account (i.e. brain/body size ratio) the differences are increased. S.J. Gould (1984), citing the South African palaeontologist P.V. Tobias argues that the determination of average 'racial' brain size is actually so methodologically complicated that nobody has as yet succeeded. Nevertheless let us assume Rushton's figures are correct. As they stand they are impossible to interpret because no standard deviation figures are supplied. Taking the Caucasoid figure as the base, the ranges are 7% (110cc) and 5% (65g). According to Passingham (1982) the modern Homo sapiens brain size ranges from 870 cc-2150 cc (N = 1039) with a mean of 1359.1 (p. 110). Rushton does not provide N's. On the face of it a 110 cc difference in mean scores does not look statistically significant. Given the small degree of difference reported, the variety of methodological problems and the likelihood of unconscious bias among many of those obtaining Rushton's source data these figures cannot be taken seriously. However, even if we take them at face value they cannot really serve the purpose Rushton wishes, namely as indices of intelligence differences. Brain size (actually head size)/IQ score correlations provided in Rushton (1990b) are at most .35 (and this is likely to be deviant), Rushton accepts .3 as the likeliest figure, brain size thus accounts for only 9% of the variance in IQscores at most. Many of the correlations (e.g. on the largest sample, 26,760 US schoolchildren) are under .2 (less than 4% of variance). So how many IQ points does a difference of 7% in brain size signify?
2 The mean racial IQs he gives as 107, 100, 85 (M, C, N respectively). As we have seen in the main text however, the meanings of these figures are highly debatable to say the least. If, as argued in the main text, the 'race and IQ' issue is so conceptually muddled as to be meaningless, then these figures can be safely ignored. To include them is to beg the question.
3 His 'maturation rate' section includes 'Age of first intercourse', 'Age of first pregnancy' and 'Life-span'-showing the Ms as 'late, late, long', the Ns as 'early, early, short' respectively and Cs as medium throughout. The data sources are not provided. On the

-316-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race, Racism, and Psychology: Towards a Reflexive History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.