Race, Racism, and Psychology: Towards a Reflexive History

By Graham Richards | Go to book overview

Subject index
(The absence of a general entry for 'whites' should be taken as signifying the white-centred nature of the topic, rather than an ethnocentric oversight of the author.)
a
Aberdeen 46, 50-1, 63 n.
abstract thought 54
achievement motivation 225
African Americans 70, 77-87passim;93, 131, 148, 237-48, 253-6, 292-3, 301-3 ;
autobiographies 74, 114 n.;
criminals 107, 286 ;
culture 79-80, 135-7, 151-2, 239, 258 n.;
delinquent adolescent girls 85, 113 n.;
education 245 ;
emotions of 78, 86 ;
family 239-42, 253, 258 n., 293 ;
handwriting of 92 ;
inhibition 109 ;
intelligence of xv, 83-7, 90-2, 101-4, 127-8, 245-8 ;
mental illness in 32, 132, 152-3, 170 ;
middle-class 67. 135-6, 265 ;
personality 150-1, 213, 238-42, 253, 258 n.;
psychologists 1, 20 n., 132-3, 156 n., 220 n., 237-8, 260, 292-6, 314 ;
schools 103 ;
stereotype of 150, 159 n.;
students 109 ;
as subjects in research 112 ;
woman 239-40 ;
see also Black Psychology;
children:
African American;
'damaged Negro' image;
intelligence/IQ:
race differences in;
'Negro';
'Negro Education' issue
Africans x, 2-8passim,19, 24, 33, 36 n., 37 n., 168, 169, 172, 197, 201, 216, 243-4, 286, 317 ;
East 77, 120 n., 166, 202-5, 251 ;
mind 248-50, 296 ;
West 206 ;
see also under specific nationalities or ethnic groups
Ainu (of Japan) 56, 58, 59, 128
Alabama, University of 289 n.
Alaska 123
Algeria 242-3
Algonquian Indians 147
Aliens Acts 219 n.
altruistic self-sacrifice 94
American Jewish Committee 227, 231
American Mercury74, 122
American Psychological Association (APA) 22, 238, 254, 257 n., 280, 290 n.
American Psychologist237-8, 245, 257 n.
Annals of Eugenics187, 192-3
anthropology/anthropologists 41-4passim;61 n., 62 n., 73, 87, 114 n., 122, 123, 140-8passim,163, 160, 181 n., 193, 196, 208, 212, 214, 220 n., 222 n., 223 n., 225 ;
functionalist 41 ;
Victorian 42, 61 n., 73, 193-7passim
anti-racism 42, 71, 75, 131, 137, 151, 217, 254, 263, 284, 292, 298-9, 307, 315 ;
arguments of 71, 111 ;
journalism 74-5 ;
white 254-5, 302-4, 306, 308
anti-semitism 4, 10 n., 31, 74, 119 n., 137-8, 153, 157-8 n., 169, 170, 174, 184 n., 190-2, 199, 202, 216, 218, 226-34, 236, 255, 256 n., 304, 308 ;
in academia 156 n.;
psychoanalytic theory of 228-9 ;
two types of 229-30
Applied Psychology 72-3, 75, 123, 131-3, 313 ;
journals 132 ;
subjects and topics studied 131-2
Arabs 13, 19, 243
Arapesh 143
'Archaic Man' see primitive mind:
Jung's theory
Arkansas 149
art, Oriental 205-6
Aryans see Nordics Ashanti 162 n.
Athenians 18
attitudes/prejudice xv, 27, 71-2, 75, 76, 107, 124, 133-9, 144, 147-8, 151, 157 n., 158 n., 212, 215, 223 n., 224, 230, 232, 235-6, 253, 300, 307, 313 ;

-365-

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