Eastern Europe at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century: A Guide to the Economies in Transition

By Ian Jeffries | Go to book overview

Introduction and overview

A Guide to the Socialist Economies was published in 1990. Covering fourteen communist countries (accounting, in mid-1998, for 1.6 billion out of a world population of 5.1 billion), the final amendments to the book had been made in early October 1989. Shortly afterwards communism collapsed in Eastern Europe, followed in late 1991 by the disintegration of the Soviet Union (the largest country in the world by area, covering a sixth of the world's land area excluding Antarctica, and then a 'superpower' able to challenge the USA in terms of military capacity). Yugoslavia also disintegrated, and in a generally very bloody fashion. Academics like myself who had invested a lifetime in studying the communist countries saw their intellectual capital mostly vanish overnight. The effort of trying to comprehend profound changes, in many ways unique events and the multiplication of countries (as well as the disappearance of the GDR into a reunified Germany!) has been staggering.

My first stab at covering what became known as the transitional economies came in 1993 with the publication of Socialist Economies and the Transition to the Market: A Guide, which includes analyses of the basic features of command economies and the general issues involved in the transition to a market economy plus chapters on the original fourteen communist countries before 1989 and their individual experiences after 1989 (including the disintegration of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia). While most countries opted for the market economy and political democracy, Cuba (initially) and North Korea retained the essential features of the traditional communist economic and political system. China, in contrast, adopted gradual and partial economic reform. Vietnam took note of the Chinese model, although there were speedier elements. Both China and Vietnam, however, remained firmly in the grip of the Communist Party.

A Guide to the Economies in Transition was published in 1996. Basically a companion volume to (as opposed to a revised edition of) Socialist Economies and the Transition to the Market: A Guide, it covers the period up to the mid-1990s. I am not an economic theorist but the volume includes an overview of the main issues in the transition from command planning to the market (including 'big bang'/'shock therapy' versus gradualism, China as an economic model and privatization). Although I am mostly interested in how economic and political systems actually change, I discuss the basic economic performance of individual

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eastern Europe at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century: A Guide to the Economies in Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables xii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Introduction and Overview 1
  • Part I - The Countries of Eastern Europe 65
  • 1 - Albania 67
  • 2 - Bulgaria 116
  • 3 - The Czech Republic 156
  • 4 - Hungary 202
  • 5 - Poland 240
  • 6 - Romania 297
  • 7 - Slovakia 348
  • Part II - General Issues 381
  • 8 - General Issues in the Transition from Command to Market Economies 383
  • Bibliography 416
  • Index 433
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 441

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.