A Critical Discourse Analysis of Family Literacy Practices: Power in and out of Print

By Rebecca Rogers | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

Into The Meeting Room

THE MEETING

The meeting took place onJune 18, 1998, at the Daybreak School, which is a school used in the district specifically for special-education purposes (see Appendix G for a full transcript of this meeting). I reviewed the case report I wrote on Vicky's progress as a reader and writer over the time I worked with her and gave a copy of it to June. I planned on presenting this report at the CSE meeting. I gave the report to June a week earlier and went over Vicky's strengths and growth as a reader and writer. June told me she would share the report with Lester. I asked Lester what he thought of the report and he told me, "you doin' real good with her. She just need to concentrate and put her mind to it and stop tryin' to act so grown. When I tell her she can't go out after she school, she gotta do her homework, she gotta listen to me." Like June, Lester did not think Vicky should be placed in a special-education class.

The morning of the meeting I picked up June and Shauna at their apartment. In the car I handed June a list of the questions she and I had brainstormed, compiled, and gone over the last time she and I worked together. Unfamiliar with the programs and policies of the school district, this was an authentic list of questions for both June and me. She told me, "You can hang on to those" (fieldnotes, 6/18/98). When we got to the school there was a 10-minute wait before we were invited into the meeting room. During this time, Shauna played with the toys in a cardboard box that were tucked under a table and June picked up a few children's books and flipped through the pages, reading the words out loud.

When the chair of the committee called June into the meeting room, Shauna and I followed her lead. I had called to speak with the chair of the committee ahead of time to ask permission to record the CSE meeting as a part of my research. She told me she would discuss it with the committee and let me know prior to the meeting. Before we went into the room, the chair told me that everyone had agreed to the tape recording. I placed the tape recorder in the middle of the table and asked each member of the committee to sign a consent form before I left the building.

The meeting lasted approximately 50 minutes. The participants in the meeting included the psychologist (AB), the chair of the committee (DT),

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Critical Discourse Analysis of Family Literacy Practices: Power in and out of Print
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 225

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.