Christopher Marlowe and Richard Baines: Journeys through the Elizabethan Underground

By Roy Kendall | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

FIRST AND FOREMOST I WOULD LIKE TO THANK STANLEY WELLS AND Arthur Kinney: without Stanley this book would never have been started, and without Arthur it would probably never have been finished. It was Stanley who accepted me at the Shakespeare Institute, looked at the discoveries I had already made and suggested a method of approach, and supervised my doctoral thesis: pulling me back from my worst speculative excesses, giving me the benefit of his vast scholarship, and making many recommendations for improvements of phrase and emphasis in the study (of which this book is an expanded and revised version). It was also Stanley who made the suggestion that I should send some early chapters to Arthur Kinney at English Literary Renaissance.

It is Arthur who I must now thank for publishing what became my first essay on the subject under the title "Richard Baines and Christopher Marlowe's Milieu” (ELR 24, no. 3 [autumn 1994]: 507—52). This forms the basis of chapters 1—3 and a small part of chapter 15 of this book—although the material has been revised and extended since its previous publication. I am obviously most grateful to Arthur and ELR for granting permission to republish. I am similarly grateful to him for awarding me, in the interim, a Visiting Fellowship at the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies when my personal coffers were exhausted and financial aid in my own country was not forthcoming, which in turn enabled me to break the back of the writing-up process in Amherst. It is he who I also have to thank for giving me the run of his immense personal library (now donated to the Center) and the benefit of his vast knowledge both of the period and of the scholarship of the period.

I still feel astonished that I have been fortunate enough to have had the guidance and support of these two great scholars, as well as privileged to have had the pleasure of their company. But it goes without saying that neither of them, nor any of the scholars and institutions I have now to thank, can be held responsible for any errors of fact or judgment in this book. Its faults are entirely my own.

There have been many contributions made to this book over

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