Christopher Marlowe and Richard Baines: Journeys through the Elizabethan Underground

By Roy Kendall | Go to book overview

Appendix A: Richard Baines's Note
"delivered on Whitsun eve last, ” 1593

A NOTE CONTAINING THE OPINION OF ON CHRISTOPHER MARLY CONcerning his damnable [opini] Judgment of Religion, and scorn of Gods word.

That the Jndians and many Authors of antiquity haue assuredly writen of aboue 16 thousand yeares agone wheras [Moyses] Adam is [said] proued to haue lived within 6 thowsand yeares.

He affirmeth that Moyses was but a Jugler & that one Heriots being Sir W Raleighs man Can do more then he.

That Moyses made the Jewes to travell xl yeares in the wildernes, (which Jorney might haue bin done in lesse then one yeare) ere they Came to the promised land to thintent that those who were privy to most of his subtilties might perish and so an everlasting superstition Remain in the hartes of the people.

That the first beginning of Religioun was only to keep men in awe.

That it was an easy matter for Moyses being brought vp in all the artes of the Egiptians to abuse the Jewes being a rude & grosse people.

That Christ was a bastard and his mother dishonest.

That he was the sonne of a Carpenter, and that if the Jewes among whome he was borne did Crucify him theie best knew him and whence he Came.

That Crist deserved better to dy then Barrabas and that the Jewes made a good Choise, though Barrabas were both a thief and a murtherer.

That if there be any god or any good Religion, then it is in the papistes because the service of god is performed with more Cerimonies, as Elevation of the mass, organs, singing men, Shaven Crownes & cta. That all protestantes are Hypocriticall asses.

That if he were put to write a new Religion, he would vndertake both a more Exellent and Admirable methode and that all the new testament is filthily written.

That the woman of Samaria & her sister were whores & that Christ knew them dishonestly.

-332-

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