Christopher Marlowe and Richard Baines: Journeys through the Elizabethan Underground

By Roy Kendall | Go to book overview

Appendix D: Contemporary English
Version of Richard Baines's Written
Recantation of 1583

THE
CONFESSION OF RICHARD
BAINES PRIEST AND LATE STV
dent of the Colledge of Rhemes, made after he was remoued out of the common gaile to his chamber.

AS MY MISERIE & WICKEDNES WAS GREATE WHICH I WILL NOW SET downe to the publishing of my ingratitude to God, the Church, and my superiors, so was Gods iustice, mercy and prouidence meruelous towards me to saluation as I verely hope. Of al which to the glory of Christ, and satisfaction of the holy Church and all her children whom I haue offended or scandalized, & to mine owne worthy confusion temporall, I intend to make this my publike confession, that al that stand, may by my example beware of a fall, and such as be fallen may thereby make hast to aryse againe.

The very ground of my fall and of al the wickednes ether committed or intended, was my pride which droue me to a lothsomenes to liue in order and obedience, to conceipts of mine owne worthines and manifold discontentement of the schollarlike condition wherein I liued, to an immoderat desire of more ease, welth, and (which I specially also respected) of more delicacie of diet and carnal delits then this place of banishment was like to yeld vnto me, though (wo vnto me that could not see so fare before) the students state in the Seminarie, where I was in very honest compt and calling is in all points so good and happy, that most wise men wonder at Gods so mercifull and plentifull prouision for the competent maintenance of so many in such a blessed trade of life and education.

Besides this, though I was not onely a student in diuinitie, but also a priest (though many waies I shewed and made my self most

-339-

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