John Donne and Conformity in Crisis in the Late Jacobean Pulpit

By Jeanne Shami | Go to book overview

INDEX TO JOHN DONNE REFERENCES
authority
civil (of kings and magistrates) 22, 83—4, 90, 99, 129, 131, 142, 159—60, 173, 203 n.62, 204, 228, 254, 259—60, 266—7
distinction of “passive” from “blind” obedience 22, 160, 259
distinction between obedience to men and to God 159—60, 259
fit places to debate laws 259, 271
ecclesiastical 23, 26, 90—1, 92—4, 99, 100, 110, 112—13, 130, 152, 159
disciplinary conformity 226, 266
frailty of kings 266—7
interpretive 28, 129—30
rejection of authority of any single commentator see also rejection of singularity under rhetoric of 82, 87, 141
of conscience 130, 160, 173, 174, 176, 226, 228, 260, 271
of the law 12, 22, 34, 77, 79, 90, 93, 100, 130, 145, 208, 271, 277
vocational 91—2, 129, 130, 172—3, 179, 218, 267
biography of 9, 10, 25 n.101 and 102, 25—6, 75—9, 78 n.12, 91, 99—100, 107, 137—8, 140 n.1, 202, 227, 266 n.21, 270 and n.29, 274—6, 274 n.3, 282—3
Church of Rome 24—30, 98—100
apostolic succession 28—9, 82
as Babylon 29, 33, 81 n.20, 88
communion with Rome 32, 34, 135 n.108, 137
communion with papists within the Church of England 137, 155
reconciliation with 32, 33—4, 135 n.108, 137, 210
Reformation 28, 32—4, 76, 81, 88, 89, 210, 222, 273
as miracle 243
charges against Reformed churches 151, 244, 270
reformed Catholicism 98
Rome as metaphor 98
younger than Reformed churches 227 and n.36
conformity of 1, 19—24, 34, 41, 75—6, 77—8, 81, 90, 101, 111—12, 210—11, 223, 229, 243, 253—4, 262, 273
conscience 20, 21—3, 24, 28, 87, 89, 94, 100, 111—12, 116, 128, 129, 130, 132, 136, 173, 174, 176, 177, 255
casuistical habits of thought 21 and n.76, 22 and n.82, 28, 76—7, 80 and n.17, 82 and n.23, 93 and n.40, 142, 159—60, 253, 258, 259—60, 262, 271, 273, 274
integration of public duty with private conscience 20, 23, 41, 89, 93, 94, 111—12, 113, 116, 129, 184, 204, 205, 272, 273, 274, 275
controversy 12, 23, 28, 29, 75, 76, 100, 137, 156, 157, 172, 180, 228, 274, 275
condemnation of public personal attacks 30, 32, 33, 76, 79, 113, 127, 270, 273, 277—80, 283
distinguished from “holy zeal” 278
inappropriate to sermons and public councils 20—1, 34, 76, 80, 94—6, 97, 137, 140, 234, 266 n.21, 276, 277—8 and n.15, 279
edifying rather than controversial preaching 76, 95, 227
fit places for doctrinal debate 34, 156, 172, 223, 276, 280, 283
reluctance to enter the “fray” 84, 276 and n.12
renovation of controverted terms 26, 31—2, 87, 95, 98, 152, 228, 235, 243—4, 254, 258, 260—1, 262, 274
resistance to polarizing rhetoric 30—1, 181, 270
return issues to problematical status 30, 32, 180, 243, 271, 277
rules governing controversial discourse see also rhetoric of 22—3, 34, 76, 81—2, 137, 156, 272, 273, 276—80, 283
conversion 23, 25, 27, 32, 92, 97, 98, 145, 260—1, 262—3, 273, 274
as circumcision 259, 273
as eucharistic sacrament 261, 273
Donne as convert see also relations with Donne under Abbot, George in General Index 24, 78
obstacles to 279

-313-

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