British Cinema of the 1950s: A Celebration

By Ian MacKillop; Neil Sinyard | Go to book overview

A 1950s timeline

Occasionally names of personnel are included in these lists (`d.' for director, `p.' for performer/s) to point up a presence, e.g. John Schlesinger as director of Starfish. Non-British films which were nonetheless really important are asterisked and put out of the alphabetical sequence. The temptation to include five excellent films of 1960 could not be resisted.

Cinema Theatre, writing, broadcasting Events
1950
Humphrey Jennings dies Theatre: Hamlet (p. Michael Redgrave) Labour Party elected: Clement Atlee PM
Bitter Springs (music: Vaughan Williams)
Theatre: T. S. Eliot, The Cocktail Party Korean War
The Blue Lamp `McCarthyism'
Dance Hall Writing: George Orwell dies
The Happiest Days of Your Life
Odette
Seven Days to Noon
The Starfish (d. John Schlesinger and others)
1951
`X' certificates start Theatre: Richard II (p. Michael Redgrave) Festival of Britain
South Pacific* Conservative Party elected: Winston Churchill PM
The Browning Version (p. Michael Redgrave)
Festival in London
The Galloping Major
His Excellency
The Lavender Hill Mob
Life in Her Hands
The Magic Box
The Man in a White Suit
Tales of Hoffman
White Corridors
1952
National Film Theatre opens Theatre: Agatha Christie, The Mousetrap Coronation of Elizabeth II
Sequence ends Fog kills 4,000 Londoners
This is Cinerama* Writing: Angus Wilson, Hemlock and After Mau-Mau rebellion in Kenya
The Robe (in CinemaScope)* First British atomic tests

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