The Economist of Xenophon

By Alexander D. O. Wedderburn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III.

OF THE VIRTUES AND RESULTS OF ECONOMY ABROAD AND AT HOME; AND THE SHARE OF THE WIFE THEREIN.

ON hearing this, Critobulus continued: Now, Socrates, I will not let you go until you have shown me what you have promised before our friends here.

1

Well, Critobulus, said Socrates, what would you say if I were to begin by showing you how some men spend a good deal of money in building useless houses, while others at a far smaller expense build such as have every necessary advantage? Would you not think that I was showing you herein one point in the matter of economy?

That I should, said Critobulus.

And what, if I were to show you the natural consequence of this? -- namely, how some men have plenty of goods and chattels of every kind, and yet cannot get at them for use, when they want them; nor even, indeed, do they know if they have them safe, thereby causing much annoyance both to themselves and their servants: whilst others,

2

-16-

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The Economist of Xenophon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Preface. ix
  • Translators' Preface. xlv
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 22
  • Chapter V 30
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VIII 53
  • Chapter IX 61
  • Chapter X 67
  • Chapter XI 72
  • Chapter XII 80
  • Chapter Xlll. 86
  • Chapter XIV 90
  • Chapter XV 93
  • Chapter XVI 97
  • Chapter XVII 101
  • Chapter XVIII 107
  • Chapter XIX 111
  • Chapter XX 118
  • Chapter XXI 126
  • Index 131
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