Bitter Fruit: African American Women in World War II

By Maureen Honey | Go to book overview

Appendix
AFRICAN AMERICAN WRITERS
Edna L. Anderson* Frenise Logan
Walter G. Arnold Thurgood Marshall
James Baldwin Booker T. Medford
Simeon Booker Jr. May Miller*
Gwendolyn Brooks* Mavis B. Mixon*
Alice C. Browning* Cora Ball Moten*
Elmer Carter Pauli Murray*
Ida Coker Clark* Constance C. Nichols*
Ruth Albert Cook* Valerie Ethelyn Parks*
William Couch Jr. Ann Petry*
Constance H. Curtis* Lucia Mae Pitts*
George E. DeMar Mrs. Charles Puryear*
Owen Dodson Muriel Rahn*
Pearl Fisher* Sgt. Aubrey Robinson
Marie Brown Frazier* O'Wendell Shaw
Helen S. Frierson* William Grant Still
Fern Gayden* Roberta I. Thomas*
Ruby Berkley Goodwin* Tomi Carolyn Tinsley*
Thelma Thurston Gorham* Grace W. Tompkins*
Shirley Graham* Margaret Walker*
Leotha Hackshaw* Hazel L. Washington*
Chester B. Himes Charles Enoch Wheeler
Elsie Mills Holton* Mae Smith Williams*
Langston Hughes Victoria Winfrey*
Zora Neale Hurston* Octavia B. Wynbush*
Georgia Douglas Johnson* Two anonymous women letter writers:
Hortense Johnson*
Robert Jones a soldier's wife,*
Roma Jones* a mother (“Georgia”)*
Melissa Linn* (pseudonym; actual name unknown)

(*=female writer)

African American ethnicity was determined by general knowledge of the writer, his or her publication in identifiably African American venues such as poetry anthologies of black writers, allusion to the writer's ethnicity in the magazines themselves, biographies, or critical studies, and self-identification within the writer's work.

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Bitter Fruit: African American Women in World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Bitter Fruit *
  • Bitter Fruit - African American Women in World War II *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • A Note on the Text xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • Section I - Woman Welder, the Crisis, April 1942 *
  • War Work 35
  • Section 2 - A Wac, the Crisis, September 1942 *
  • Racism on the Home Front 127
  • Section 3 - Riveters, Opportunity, Spring 1945 *
  • The Double Victory Campaign 257
  • Section 4 - Singer Lena Horne, the Crisis, January 1943 *
  • Popular Culture and the Arts 317
  • Appendix 381
  • Bibliography 383
  • Index to Authors 391
  • Index to Titles 395
  • Credits 399
  • About the Editor 401
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