Fault Lines and Controversies in the Study of Seventeenth-Century English Literature

By Claude J. Summers; Ted-Larry Pebworth | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Robert C. Evans has taught at Auburn University at Montgomery since 1982. He has recently been named Distinguished Teaching Professor. He is the author of numerous essays and of books on Ben Jonson, Martha Moulsworth, Frank O'Connor, Brian Friel, Kate Chopin, Ambrose Bierce, short fiction, and other topics. His work, including his most recent book, Ben Jonson's Major Plays, reflects his interest in critical pluralism.

Joan Faust is Assistant Professor of English at Southeastern Louisiana University. She has published on Donne, Jonson, Castiglione, Milton, and Dante. She is presently working on the liminal aspects of seventeenth-century patronage literature.

Dennis Flynn has been Professor of English at Bentley College for twenty-four years. He is author of John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility, which was published by Indiana University Press in 1995, and is working on other biographical studies. He has also been associated with the Donne Variorum, serving as a contributing editor of The Anniversaries and the Epicedes and Obsequies and as an assistant textual editor of The Elegies.

Tobias Gregory is Assistant Professor of English at California State University— Northridge. He has published articles on Spenser and Tasso, and is at work on a book titled “The Epic Supernatural: Divine Action in Renaissance Heroic Poetry.” He is the recipient of the Isabel MacCaffery Prize of the International Spenser Society.

Dan Jaeckle is Professor of English and Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Houston—Victoria. He has published articles on Donne, Marvell, Cleveland, and Traherne.

Jeffrey Johnson is Professor of English at Northern Illinois University. He is author of The Theology of John Donne and has published articles on Donne, Crashaw, Herbert, and Vaughan. In addition to serving as a contributing editor to the Donne Variorum, he is coeditor of Discovering and (Re)Covering the Seventeenth-Century Religious Lyric.

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