Scouts and Spies of the Civil War

By William Gilmore Beymer; Howard Pyle | Go to book overview

Mrs. Greenhow

These pages record the story of the woman who cast a pebble into the sea of circumstance—a pebble from whose widening ripples there rose a mighty wave, on whose crest the Confederate States of America were borne through four years of civil war.

Rose O'Neal Greenhow gave to General Beauregard information which enabled him to concentrate the widely scattered Confederate forces in time to meet McDowell on the field of Manassas, and there, with General Johnson, to win for the South the all-important battle of Bull Run.

Mrs. Greenhow's cipher despatch—nine words on a scrap of paper— set in motion the reinforcements which arrived at the height of the battle and turned it against the North. But for the part she played in the Confederate victory Rose O'Neal Greenhow paid a heavy price.

During the Buchanan administration Mrs. Greenhow was one of the leaders of Washington society. She was a Southerner by birth, but a resident of Washington from her girlhood; a widow, beautiful, accomplished, wealthy, and noted for her wit and her forceful personality. Her home was the rendezvous of those prominent in official life in Washington—the “court circle, ” had America been a monarchy. She was personally acquainted with all the leading men of the country, many of whom had partaken of her hospitality. President Buchanan was a close personal friend; a friend, too, was William H. Seward, then Senator from New York; her niece, a granddaughter of Dolly Madison,

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Scouts and Spies of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Scouts and Spies of the Civil War *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • Introduction *
  • Rowand *
  • “williams, C.S.A.” *
  • Miss Van Lew *
  • Young *
  • Bowie *
  • The Phillipses—father and Son *
  • Mrs. Greenhow *
  • Landegon *
  • John Beall, Privateersman *
  • Timothy Webster: Spy *
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