Mothers & Sons: Feminism, Masculinity, and the Struggle to Raise Our Sons

By Andrea O'Reilly | Go to book overview

early attachment to their mothers and others. These ills, as I have sought to indicate, include such reactions as stammering, recurring nightmares, teenage self-division, schizophrenia, suicide, and manic self-glorification. Their treatment accordingly entails addressing men's early loss of attachment to their mothers. Hence the recent enthusiasm of feminists for Bowlby's attachment theory, with which I began and which is, as I have sought to demonstrate, highly germane to redressing the losses and wrongs done by sexism-in this case to mothers and sons.


WORKS CITED

b
Barker, P. The Ghost Road. London: Viking, 1995.
Bion, W. R. “A Theory of Thinking.” In Second Thoughts. London: Heinemann, 1962.
---. The Long Week-End. London: Free Association Books, 1982.
Bowlby, J. Maternal Care and Mental Health. Geneva: World Health Organisation, 1951.

c
Chodorow, N. The Reproduction of Mothering. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1978.

d
Diekstra, R., et al. “Suicide and Suicidal Behaviour among Adolescents.” In Psychological Disorders in Young People, edited by M. Rutter and D. Smith. Chichester: Wiley, 1995.
Durkheim, E. Suicide: A Study in Sociology. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1952 (1888).

f
Farrell, W. The Myth of Male Power. London: Fourth Estate, 1994.
Freud, S. “Beyond the Pleasure Principle, ” In Standard Edition of the Complete Collected Works, vol. l8, 1920.

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Galdos, P., and J. van-Os. “Gender, Psychopathology, and Development.” Schizophrenia Research, vol. l4, no. 2 (1993): l05-1l2.
Gilligan, C. “I Don't Want to Talk about It.” New York Times Book Review (Feb. l6, 1997): 25.
Greenson, R. “Dis-identifying from Mothers.” International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, vol. 49 (1968): 370-374.

j
Jablensky, A., et al. “Schizophrenia.” In Psychological Medicine: Monograph Supplement20. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.
Joyce, J. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. London: Penguin Books, 1916.

l
Laing, R. The Divided Self. London: Penguin, l965.
Laufer, M. “The Central Masturbation Fantasy.” Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, vol. 3l (1976): 297-3l6.

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MacCarthy, F. William Morris. London: Faber, 1994.

-233-

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Mothers & Sons: Feminism, Masculinity, and the Struggle to Raise Our Sons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 19
  • Works Cited 20
  • I - Mothering and Motherhood 23
  • 1 - Who Are We This Time? 25
  • 2 - Mothering Sons with Special Needs 42
  • Works Cited 55
  • 3 - Masculinity, Matriarchy, and Myth a Black Feminist Perspective 56
  • Works Cited 69
  • 4 - Mothers, Sons, and the Art of Peacebuilding 71
  • Works Cited 88
  • 5 - In Black and White Anglo-American and African-American Perspectives on Mothers and Sons 91
  • Notes 116
  • Works Cited 117
  • II - Men and Masculinities 119
  • 6 - Swimming Against the Tide Feminists' Accounts of Mothering Sons 121
  • Notes 137
  • 7 - Feminist Academic Mothers' Influences on Their Sons' Masculinity 141
  • Works Cited 155
  • 8 - Lesbians Raising Sons Bringing Up a New Breed of Men 157
  • 9 - Can Boys Grow into Mothers? Maternal Thinking and Fathers' Reflections 163
  • III - Mothers and Sons: Connections and Disconnections 183
  • 10 - Raising Relational Boys 185
  • Notes 215
  • 11 - Attachment and Loss 217
  • Works Cited 233
  • 12 - Mother-Son Relationships in the Shadow of War 235
  • Notes 249
  • Works Cited 250
  • 13 - This is Leave-Taking Mothers, Signatures, and Countermemory 251
  • Notes 263
  • List of Contributors 265
  • Index 271
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