Mothers & Sons: Feminism, Masculinity, and the Struggle to Raise Our Sons

By Andrea O'Reilly | Go to book overview

INDEX

a
Abbey, Sharon, 10, 265
abortion, 34
Achilles, 107-108, 185, 203, 214
activism, 241-42 ;
political, 82
ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder), 191
ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), 205
adolescence (see also boys, adolescent), 36, 51, 66, 73, 76, 109, 208-211, 221, 224 ;
stages of, 47
(see also developmental stages)
adolescents, 198-99 (see also boys, adolescent)
adoption, 42-55, 158, 162
Adult Children of Alcoholic and
Dysfunctional Families, 44
adult role models, 129-30 ;
gendering of, 131
adulthood, 168, 200, 225, 236
African-Americans (see also blacks), 59-61, 62, 68, 77, 112 ;
culture, 56 ;
women
(see women, black)
Agammemnon, 92
aggression, 130, 145, 172, 192, 194
AIDS, 34, 36, 160
Alda, Alan, 94
alienation, 71, 198, 208, 212
Almog, Oz, 246
Althusser, Louis, 91
anger, 194, 208
anxiety, 209, 213
Aoki, Douglas Sadao, 17, 265
Aoki, June Yuriko, 17, 251, 253, 265
Apollo, 92, 145
Arab(s), 248, 249 n. 1;
states, 235
Arcana, Judith, 4-5, 100-101, 104-105, 115, 147, 149-50, 152, 153 ;
EveryMother's Son,4, 94-98
Aries, Phillippe, 76
Association for Research on Mothering (ARM), 2, 19 n. 2
Athena, 92
attachment:
and loss, 217-234 ;
theory, 217
(see also Bowlby, John)
Attention Deficit Disorder. See ADD
Australia, 127, 137 n. 1
authenticity, 194, 203, 210, 214

b
Backes, Nancy, 1-2
Balbo, Laura, 169
Baldwin, James, 113
Barker, Pat:
Regeneration,219-20
Barnett, Rosalind, and Caryl Rivers, 84
Barr, Roseanne, 159
behaviors:
acting out, 206, 208, 210 ;
aggressive, 78, 123, 128, 192 ;
boy, 189, 205 ;
high-risk, 198-99, 205 ;
macho, 130 ;
nurturant, 128
(see also nurturance; nurturing);
phallocentric, 129 ;
relational, 206 ;
traditional forms of masculine, 136
Bennington, Geoffrey, 262
bereavement, 247
Bergman, Steve, 191

-271-

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Mothers & Sons: Feminism, Masculinity, and the Struggle to Raise Our Sons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 19
  • Works Cited 20
  • I - Mothering and Motherhood 23
  • 1 - Who Are We This Time? 25
  • 2 - Mothering Sons with Special Needs 42
  • Works Cited 55
  • 3 - Masculinity, Matriarchy, and Myth a Black Feminist Perspective 56
  • Works Cited 69
  • 4 - Mothers, Sons, and the Art of Peacebuilding 71
  • Works Cited 88
  • 5 - In Black and White Anglo-American and African-American Perspectives on Mothers and Sons 91
  • Notes 116
  • Works Cited 117
  • II - Men and Masculinities 119
  • 6 - Swimming Against the Tide Feminists' Accounts of Mothering Sons 121
  • Notes 137
  • 7 - Feminist Academic Mothers' Influences on Their Sons' Masculinity 141
  • Works Cited 155
  • 8 - Lesbians Raising Sons Bringing Up a New Breed of Men 157
  • 9 - Can Boys Grow into Mothers? Maternal Thinking and Fathers' Reflections 163
  • III - Mothers and Sons: Connections and Disconnections 183
  • 10 - Raising Relational Boys 185
  • Notes 215
  • 11 - Attachment and Loss 217
  • Works Cited 233
  • 12 - Mother-Son Relationships in the Shadow of War 235
  • Notes 249
  • Works Cited 250
  • 13 - This is Leave-Taking Mothers, Signatures, and Countermemory 251
  • Notes 263
  • List of Contributors 265
  • Index 271
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